上海ty店2020

Ivy Tech Community College names Vice President for K-14 Initiatives and Statewide Partnerships

first_imgIndianapolis, IN—Ivy Tech Community College has named Rebecca Rahschulte vice president of K-14 initiatives and statewide partnerships. Rahschulte most recently served as the site director for the Batesville location where she provided leadership, supervision, and guidance in the development, delivery, administration, and implementation of all programs and services at the Batesville site.Ivy Tech continues its focus on K-14 career pathway completions, which brings together K-12 school districts, community organizations, legislators and employers to meet the needs of the workforce. Rahschulte, in this role, will focus on building trusted partnerships and shared statewide strategic priorities. The position will lead all aspects of K-14 initiatives, including collaborating with chancellors and campus teams to develop focused and continuing communication plans designed for K-12 partners, high school students and parents outlining the benefits of the College’s comprehensive programming.Rahschulte holds a Bachelor’s degree in psychology, as well as both a Master’s of Education and Doctorate of Philosophy in school psychology. She supported students as a school psychologist from 2002 to 2009, and she began her career at Ivy Tech as an adjunct professor in 2004. She received the Ivy Tech Student Service Award for Outstanding Faculty Contributions in 2010 and the Ivy Tech President’s Award for Excellence in Instruction in 2014. As an engaged member of her community, Rahschulte devotes some of her free time to serving as a United Way board member and actively participating on the Batesville Chamber of Commerce board.last_img read more

Pregnant FL woman saves family by fatally shooting intruder with AR-15

first_imgA Florida woman is being hailed a hero for saving her family’s lives during a violent home invasion, Wednesday evening.Jeremy King told BN9 that his wife “evened the playing field and kept them from killing me.”Around 9 p.m., Wednesday, two masked men armed with guns broke into the Lithia family home.One of the men first grabbed the couple’s 11-year-old daughter before violently attacking the male victim, police say.King said one of the men pistol-whipped him while another kicked him repeatedly in the head during the attack.His wife, who is eight months pregnant, was in the back bedroom and peeked out to see what was going on, according to King.He said that one of the men shot then at her.She retreated, grabbed an AR-15, and returned fire, King said.Deputies later found a man identified as one of the intruders dead in a nearby ditch.The second gunman fled the scene after the fatal shot was fired and is still at large, deputies said.Detectives do not believe the attack was random and are currently investigating the relationship between the victims and suspects.The Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office also noted that the AR-15 used by the pregnant female was in the family home legally.“Anyone with information is asked to call Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office at 813-247-8200.”last_img read more

Duquette promises Orioles will work “harder and smarter” to compete

first_imgDan Duquette did as well as you could reasonably expect in his introductory press conference after the public-relations disaster that was the Orioles’ general manager search over the last few weeks.The new vice president of baseball operations — a Massachusetts native — recalled his days of imitating Brooks Robinson and the 1966 Orioles in his backyard as a child. In fact, the Hall of Fame third baseman was the first major league player Duquette met many years ago during a trip to Fenway Park.In laying out his vision for returning the Orioles to the glory days, he referenced the philosophy of Harry Dalton, who served as general manager during Baltimore’s most prosperous time from 1966 through 1971.“Aggressive scouting will build you a winning ball club; aggressive international scouting, I believe, will build you a championship ball club. You weave that in with a sound player development operation.”It sounded heartwarming — even a little romantic — before the familiar warning signals that we’ve heard time and time again from others who’ve tried and failed in turning around an organization stuck in baseball purgatory for the last 14 years.Duquette stopped short of repeating the infamous “grow the arms, buy the bats” mantra of former front office head Andy MacPhail, but the former Montreal Expos and Boston Red Sox general manager made it clear the development of pitching would remain the organization’s top priority. It’s a fair and prudent strategy, but much like his predecessor, Duquette couldn’t resist referencing the “behemoths” of the American League East in what’s become a tired excuse for those wanting reasons to believe in the Orioles again.Denouncing the inflated payrolls of your divisional opponents might be tolerable if you were being left at the altar every season with 85 to 90 wins, but it smells of excuse-making when you’re not even allowed in the church after failing to approach the 80-win mark in seven years.But that critique aside, Duquette’s stated commitment to improve scouting and player development is a much-needed strategy for an organization poor in both areas. Despite what many will tell you, finding and developing your own talent and spending money at the major league level do not have to be mutually exclusive. The latter, of course, is dependent on majority owner Peter Angelos, which won’t instill much faith in anyone with ties to the Orioles.“When you don’t have the resources that the top two clubs have, you have to work harder and you have to work smarter,” Duquette said. “You have to do a better job in scouting and you have to do a better job in player development. If you can build up the inventory of your farm system and you’ve got core players coming to your major league team, you’ve got something to talk about. The team that has the best farm system is the team that competes, year in and year out.”Working harder and smarter than the competition sounds great, but how much can the organization really improve with holdovers such as John and Dave Stockstill entrenched in the front office with no track record to support it?And that’s overlooking the fact that Duquette hasn’t worked in a major league front office in nearly a decade. Though claiming he’s maintained contacts throughout the game, how “wired in” will he be to the everyday happenings of baseball circa 2011?With the ever-increasing dependence on statistically-based talent evaluation — more commonly referred to as sabermetrics — how far has the Orioles’ head man fallen behind during his absence from Major League Baseball since 2002?“Your [former] manager here, Earl Weaver, knew the value of on-base percentage way ahead of the sabermetricians,” said Duquette, who added that Weaver’s book on baseball strategy will be required reading throughout the organization. “In fact, I would call that the groundwork for today’s stats. [Weaver] knew the value of scoring a run. He knew the value of how precious each out is, and he was able to impart that on his ball club.”For Duquette, there’s little time to get acclimated to his new surroundings as he must balance finding a scouting director and a minor league pitching instructor with a thin free-agent market that opened for business last week. It’s not exactly an easy task for a man who’s just now moving into his office at the Warehouse.Continue >>>last_img read more