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In this hour of our testing: New York bishop writes…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Nov 1, 2017 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC November 1, 2017 at 7:25 pm ” If you are not able to find an IED or a bullet, then single out the disbelieving American, Frenchman, or any of their allies. Smash his head with a rock, or slaughter him with a knife, or run him over with your car, or throw him down from a high place, or choke him, or poison him.” ISIS spokesman Abu Mohammad al-Adnani, 2014.Christians change hearts through the Truth of the Word Made Flesh.These evil demons seek to only to steal, kill, and destroy. (John 10:10). TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ November 3, 2017 at 12:43 am It would be less confusing if Bishop Dietsche did not include terms such as “Muslim” and “Islamic community”. We are all shocked and unhappy with the killings done by suspect Sayfullo Saipov. It would be more realistic to portray the killings done by a soldier of ISIS than a Muslim. Such incident will undoubtedly force the US govt to re-examine their immigration policy but this will not be used as pretext of punishing the Islamic community as a whole. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC November 1, 2017 at 8:58 pm I am an Episcopalian born and raised and I have friends who are Muslim. I agree with the bishop sentiments most Muslims are not mileage that the religion of Islam teaches peace. The best analogy I have ever heard is that Islamic extremism (like ISIS Al Queda other Islamic terrorist groups) is to Islam what the Ku Klux Klan is to Christianity. Yes Jesus teaches us to love our neighbor as ourselves. But yes in times like this it’s easier said than done but nothing ever worth having or doing is ever easy. Turn to prayer turn to the church for comfort it’s not an empty sentiment. It’s a way to gather and start to heal and show the terrorist they didn’t win. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA November 1, 2017 at 5:13 pm Quentin Durward’s response encapsulates my thoughts exactly so I need not add to them. November 2, 2017 at 1:18 pm I agree completely with Quentin Durward. Church leaders who accuse members of their flock of hate-mongering because they believe in a tougher response to such outrages than reassuring words and flowers should be embarrassed by their own naivete. Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Jawaharlal Prasad says: Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York November 2, 2017 at 7:50 am From Bishop Dietsche; ‘Muslims are as bereaved and angry about these killings as anyone else in our city….’ This seems to be a common response to these terrorist attrocities. if this is so then where is the outrage and condemnation for such acts from organizations like CAIR & USCMO? Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Thomas Scott Ball Jr says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY November 1, 2017 at 8:45 pm I have typed in my e-mail address and my name correctly. What more information do you want, please? New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI November 1, 2017 at 11:33 am These press releases have become formulaic. I’m tired of hearing the same vacuous musings and calls to prayer from Church leaders in denial. There are some very sick people in world. We can’t help them and they can’t help themselves if we are all in denial. Implying that innocent people are dying because we don’t understand each other is crap. Love is very powerful but love is not passive. We should pray that our leaders find strength to stand up proactively against terrorism instead of meekly enabling it with lame excuses. November 6, 2017 at 3:06 pm Doug Desper is correct. Sadly, it seems there are fewer and fewer Episcopal clergymen who do not subscribe to the “few bad eggs” argument and those who do not largely keep quiet because they fear being ostracized and possibly hurt professionally. This is an unfortunate situation that clearly is among the reasons why so many faithful Episcopalians are leaving the Church. How many more horrors like New York will it take before there is any chance of the tide turning? And will there be any Episcopal Church left by that time worthy of saving? The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tony Oberdorfer says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET November 4, 2017 at 8:40 pm Appreciate the compliment Tony but there are times, I struggle a lot in deciding which is better – violence or non-violence. The country I come from has seen Muslim invasions for over thousand years and that too with greater brutality with repeated invasions. Honest historians have written much about this. I agree with you that Muslims have their own understanding as to how infidels ought to be treated. Read about the treatment of minorities in Islamic countries including Pakistan and Bangladesh. Surprisingly in India, often times, Hindus are made to feel second class citizens with respect to the Muslims over certain rights! I won’t be surprised if in near future, Christians in US will be made to feel as second class citizens.US should do what is best for the security of this nation and its citizens. In this hour of our testing: New York bishop writes to diocese after terror attack Quentin Durward says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Catherine Cummings says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Doug Desper says: Thomas Scott Ball Jr says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tony Oberdorfer says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ecumenical & Interreligious November 1, 2017 at 5:48 pm I do agree with Quentin Durward. We are ask by Jesus to Love our neighbor as ourselves. But these people that are doing the terrorism do not love us. They want to worship the way they do. To comfor to their way of thinking. If they want to do and think the way they do I have no problem with them going back to their own country. Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (14) [Episcopal Diocese of New York] My Dear Brothers and Sisters, The news of what appears to have been a terror-related attack in Lower Manhattan comes to me as Bishop Glasspool and I are continuing our visit to Bishop Chilongani in the Diocese of Central Tanganyika. How difficult it is to be away from our city when it is in crisis!I join with all in our diocese, all people of faith, and all our city in mourning the lives lost and the chaos visited upon our own streets. I know that opportunities for prayer are already being planned for tomorrow and following days. I urge you to go and be with one another, and pray with one another, and turn a common face toward the God who is balm for weary and broken hearts.I know that in every church the victims of this violence will be remembered in prayer today, tomorrow and at our Sunday liturgies. Pray also for our country, and for God’s guidance for our leaders. Pray for peace. Pray for understanding across religions, cultures and political philosophies. And pray for ourselves, that we may guard our hearts, that we may by the grace of God respond to hatred with love, and violence with peace.Once again it is crucial that we do not extrapolate from the violence committed by one man to condemn or blame the larger Islamic community, or to view all Muslims as dangerous. Faithful, peaceful Muslims are as bereaved and angry about these killings as anyone else in our city, and we know the Islamic community to be our friends.Now is the time when we who follow a God of peace, across our several religions, must stand together against all forces of destruction. Indeed, the love of peace and the renunciation of the evil powers which corrupt and destroy are contained within the heart of our baptismal life. That is who we are.I long to return to you, and pray for you every one in this hour of our testing. And always I remain Yours,The Rt. Rev. Andrew ML DietscheBishop of New York Tony Oberdorfer says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls November 3, 2017 at 2:51 pm Jawaharlal Prasad sounds like a decent person but I must disagree with him in distinguishing between a soldier of ISIS and a regular Muslim. Obviously there are many reasonably disposed Muslims around the world. But in my understanding the Koran specifies that no one can be a really good Muslim unless he commits himself to killing non-Muslim infidels who are unwilling to convert. Since most if not all of the terrorists such as Sayfullo Saipov “went terrorist” AFTER coming to the United States despite being thoroughly “vetted,” common sense suggests the advisability of a blanket ban on immigrants from certain Middle Eastern countries (with rare exceptions) until such time as the Islamic threat is finally over. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Jawaharlal Prasad says: Bill Louis says: Submit an Event Listing November 1, 2017 at 7:20 pm ” If you are not able to find an IED or a bullet, then single out the disbelieving American, Frenchman, or any of their allies. Smash his head with a rock, or slaughter him with a knife, or run him over with your car, or throw him down from a high place, or choke him, or poison him.” ISIS spokesman Abu Mohammad al-Adnani, 2014.Christians change hearts through the Truth of the Word Made Flesh.These evil demons seek to only to steal, kill, and destroy. (John 10:10). Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Thomas Scott Ball Jr says: Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing November 6, 2017 at 12:54 pm One day it must be faced that many countries with a majority Muslim culture often are in turmoil and violence. Lay aside any blame for the moment and simply observe the cultural realities of those countries where Islam dominates. Terror attack after terror attack has the same formulary by wishful apologists who rush to state that there are moderate Muslims. Of course there are – and those people are wonderful, but they will also honestly tell you that they dare not stick their necks out too far to challenge the majority view of Islam. Would they be welcomed in many of those nations where caliphate Islam dominates? Would they be targeted as apostates, even here in some of America’s mosques and schools? We have now gone well past the “few bad eggs” argument that tries to prove that cultural Islam has random lone wolves and that they do not represent true Islam. It begs to be asked, “How many thousands have made up the ‘bad eggs’ basket so far?” Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Dn. Dorothy Royal says: Barbara Burgess says: last_img read more