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There Is No Medical Evidence On Record To Show That Accused Is A Drug Addict: Delhi HC Grants Bail To Accused Under NDPS [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesThere Is No Medical Evidence On Record To Show That Accused Is A Drug Addict: Delhi HC Grants Bail To Accused Under NDPS [Read Order] Karan Tripathi29 Sep 2020 9:43 PMShare This – xDelhi High Court has granted bail to a person accused under sections 20 and 29 of the Narcotic Drugs & Psychotropic Substances Act by noting that the Prosecution failed to show any medical evidence to support its narrative that the accused is a drug addict. While granting bail, the Single Bench of Justice Vibhu Bakhru further observed that there are reasonable grounds to believe…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court has granted bail to a person accused under sections 20 and 29 of the Narcotic Drugs & Psychotropic Substances Act by noting that the Prosecution failed to show any medical evidence to support its narrative that the accused is a drug addict. While granting bail, the Single Bench of Justice Vibhu Bakhru further observed that there are reasonable grounds to believe that the accused might be acquitted of offences that he’s charged with. In the present matter, a bail application was moved by the accused person who was arrested by the Narcotics Control Bureau for allegedly smuggling and dealing with the commercial quantity of charas. To argue against the bail application, the NCB heavily relied upon the ‘voluntary statements’ of the accused recorded under section 67 of the NDPS Act. The agency also cited various recoveries which were made in pursuance of the section 67 statement of the accused. The court, however, took note of the fact that the issue of whether statements made under section 67 of the NDPS Act are admissible evidence has been referred to a larger bench of the Supreme Court in Tofan Singh v. State of Tamil Nadu. The court further observed that even if such self-incriminating statements made under section 67 are accepted as admissible, they are a weak form of evidence and can be used only to corroborate other evidence. The court also took cognisance of the fact that the disclosure statement of one of the accused doesn’t correspond with the recovery made from him. After perusing these submissions, the court observed that: ‘Considering the above, this Court is of the view that there are reasonable grounds to believe that the petitioner may be acquitted. Admittedly, the petitioner is not involved in any other criminal case and there is no reason to believe that he would commit a similar offence, if released. It appears to be the prosecution’s case that the petitioner had begun dealing in drugs to feed his addiction. But, as noticed earlier, there is nothing on record to establish that the petitioner is a drug addict.’ The court also clarified that observations made in this order are only prima facie and solely for the purposes of examining whether the petitioner ought to be released on bail. The Petitioner in the present case was represented by Mr Akshay Bhandari and Mr Digvijay Singh.Click Here To Download Order[Read Order] Next Storylast_img read more

Ndakuna Fonso Amilou, Oxford’s Rare rising star

first_imgOxford postgraduate student Ndakuna Fonso Amilou has been named the best black student in the UK at the Rare Rising Stars awards for 2016.Amilou, a postgraduate student at Green Templeton College and the Oxford Internet Institute, was given the top spot on the list of ten black students during a ceremony at the Palace of Westminster on the July 14.Rare Rising Stars is organised by recruitment agency Rare, which specialises in professional employment for people from ethnic minority backgrounds. Set up eight years ago, it seeks to highlight the exceptional talent of some of the UK’s black students.The students showcased by the award are selected by a panel of judges, which this year was made up by Tom Chigbo, Adrian Joseph, Trevor Phillips OBE, Jean Tomlin OBE and Labour MP David Lammy, the last of whom presented the award.Amiou was born in rural Cameroon. After qualifying as a mental health nurse, he moved to London and worked full time for the NHS whilst studying for a degree in Electronic and Electrical Engineering from Brunel University.After graduation, he founded a clinic in the Cameroonian village of Bessengue, using his own money to cover the start-up costs. The clinic is now run by one of Amiou’s brothers, also a nurse, and treats over 100 patients a day.Amiou went on to work for Motorola and Vodaphone before winning the Oxford Pershing Square Graduate Scholarship to study a 1+1 MSc and MBA in Social Science and the Internet. He is the first Cameroonian to attend the Oxford Internet Institute.Students from Oxford University have often featured on the Rare Rising Stars list in the past. Fourteen Oxford students have been named in the last eight years, three of whom were awarded the top place.last_img read more

Earth Talk: Bamboo

first_imgDear EarthTalk: I’ve noticed that bamboo is very trendy right now, apparently—in part—for environmental reasons. Can you enlighten?                                                 — Eric M., via e-mail Bamboo has a long history of economic and cultural significance, primarily in East Asia and South East Asia where it has been used for centuries for everything from building material to food to medicine. There are some 1,000 different species of bamboo growing in very diverse climates throughout the world, including the southeastern United States. Bamboo’s environmental benefits arise largely out of its ability to grow quickly—in some cases three to four feet per day—without the need for fertilizers, pesticides or much water. Bamboo also spreads easily with little or no care. In addition, a bamboo grove releases some 35 percent more oxygen into the air than a similar-sized stand of trees, and it matures (and can be replanted) within seven years (compared to 30-50 years for a stand of trees), helping to improve soil conditions and prevent erosion along the way. Bamboo is so fast-growing that it can yield 20 times more timber than trees on the same area. Today, heightened consumer environmental awareness has given sales of bamboo flooring, clothing, building materials and other items a huge boost. As an attractive and sturdy alternative to hardwood flooring, bamboo is tough to beat. According to Pacific Northwest green building supplier Ecohaus, bamboo—one of the firm’s top selling flooring options—is harder, more moisture resistant and more stable than even oak hardwoods. Ecohaus carries both the EcoTimber and Teragren brands of bamboo, and ships worldwide. Bamboo is also making waves in the clothing industry as an eco-chic and functional new fabric. Softer than cotton and with a texture more akin to silk or cashmere, bamboo clothes naturally draw moisture away from the skin, so it’s great for hot weather or for sweaty workouts. It also dries in about half the time as cotton clothing. Some critics point out that the process of converting bamboo to fabric can take a heavy environmental toll, with the most cost-effective and widespread method involving a harsh chemical-based hydrolysis-alkalization process followed by multi-phase bleaching. The Green Guide counters, though, that bamboo still has a much lower environmental impact than pesticide-laden conventional cotton and petroleum-derived nylon and polyester fabrics. Consumers interested in trying out bamboo clothing should look for the Bamboosa and EcoDesignz labels, two of the leaders in the fast-growing sector of green fashion. Bamboo is also making inroads into the paper industry, though there are fears that too fast a transition there would threaten ecologically diverse bamboo forests across Southeast Asia and elsewhere. The Earth Island Institute, among other groups concerned about forest loss due to paper consumption, would instead like to see more research into using agricultural waste to make paper instead of wood pulp or bamboo. Regardless, bamboo in all its forms might one day soon be one of the most important plants in the world. CONTACTS: Ecohaus, www.ecohaus.com; The Green Guide, www.thegreenguide.com; Bamboosa, www.bamboosa.com; EcoDesignz, www.ecodesignz.com; Earth Island Institute, www.earthisland.org. GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: [email protected] Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php.last_img read more