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JSIF supports Break The Silence campaign to protect children

first_img Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppcenter_img The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provo Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKingston, Jamaica, January 27, 2017 – The Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF) has provided support to the Office of the Children’s Registry (OCR) ‘Break the Silence’ campaign in the sum of $11.9 million through the Basic Needs Trust Fund.The Break the Silence campaign is an initiative with a multi-pronged approach to protect children against abuse.   It aims to reach victims and their families with a message to speak out and denounce child abuse and break the stigma of shame that surrounds the issue of child sexual abuse as a first step to help.  It was developed after an island wide survey showed that for every 10 adults who admitted that they knew about cases of child abuse, only one was willing to come forward to make a report.Project Manager of the Basic Needs Trust Fund, Celia Dillon, tells JIS News that the JSIF is assisting the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, under which the campaign falls, to inform persons on the importance of reporting instances of child abuse.  She informs that the JSIF funded the extension of the campaign last year at a cost of $4.8 million, with an additional $7.1 million towards the production of a storybook, which is to come on stream. There is also a training segment to be undertaken. “We assisted the OCR directly in their school tours, focusing mainly on (six) of our schools targeted under the Basic Needs Trust Fund… teaching the students how to report, identify and respond to instances of abuse against children,” Ms. Dillon explains.  The extended ‘Break the Silence’ campaign ran from June to December 2016 and included radio and television advertisements, and information posted on social media platforms.The six schools were: Mandeville Primary, Christiana Moravian Primary and Infant, Old Harbour Primary, Ocho Rios Primary, Discovery Bay All-Age, and Brown’s Hall Primary.  The school tours took the form of open day discussions with representatives from the OCR, Office of the Children’s Advocate and the Child Development Agency.  “Guidance Counsellors in those schools have informed that there has been an increase in cases reported to them. On one side that is sad to hear, but on the other side, the school tours worked and the kids felt comfortable in going to their guidance counsellors to let them know what has been happening to them,” Ms. Dillon says.She notes that the local television and radio aspect of the campaign is finished and efforts are being made to get more funding.  “We are constantly trying to see if we can get additional partners to help us along this journey. We see how relevant it is…we are seeing too much of it in our papers now and our children absolutely need help,” the Project Manager adds.Meanwhile, training workshops are to be held with Ministry of Education Regional Officers, principals, teachers, and Parent-Teacher Association Executives on how to conduct readings with students using the storybook.  Ms. Dillon tells JIS News it is hoped that the book will be released and launched by April this year. The book has received approval from the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information and will be added to the Family Life curriculum.The Storybook package will include: a full colour illustrated storybook, accompanying DVD with illustrations, narration, sign language translation, music and an accompanying teacher’s guide. The message of identifying, responding and reporting abuse is appropriately packaged into a story to suit the target audience of children eight to 12 years old.  There will also be 60 Braille copies of the book, as requested by the Ministry’s Special Education Unit, for distribution in schools.  “This book is targeting vulnerable groups, so it is extremely important that when we are getting this message out there, it gets to all persons who may be affected by cases of child abuse,” Ms. Dillon says.  A mandatory parents’ forum is to be held in each school one to three months after principals and staff have been engaged.The Break the Silence campaign was first launched during the period 2015-16 and it featured several prominent celebrities and business leaders encouraging persons to report physical, sexual and emotional abuse of children.  The programme, supported by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), was a direct response to the ‘Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices’ survey on child maltreatment in Jamaica, which the OCR commissioned with technical and financial support from UNICEF.  The OCR received more than 44,000 reports of child abuse for the period 2007-2014.Persons can make a report of child abuse to the OCR by sending an email to: [email protected]; or by visiting the four OCR offices located in Kingston, Manchester, St. Mary and Westmoreland.  Persons can also call the OCR toll free at: 1-888- PROTECT (776-8328) (Flow) Tel: 908-2132, 908-2143 (Flow); 618-5888 (Digicel landline); 754-9133 (Flow); 631-8933 (Flow); 631-8908 (Flow); Cell: 822-7031 (Flow) 878-2882 (Digicel); and Fax: 908-2579. Photo credit: Jamaica Gleanerlast_img read more

Police issue costly tickets for scooter riders without helmets on San Diego

first_imgPolice issue costly tickets for scooter riders without helmets on San Diego boardwalks Posted: June 6, 2018 Sasha Foo, Sasha Foo 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — San Diego Police are getting tough on motorized scooter riders who aren’t wearing helmets.The helmets are required by law, but many riders either don’t know or don’t care about the regulation.The requirement is spelled out in the California vehicle code that covers motorized scooters. It’s also in the fine print on the ride-sharing app that’s used for the “Bird” or “Lime Bike” scooters.On the Pacific Beach boardwalk, the word is spreading about the more vigorous enforcement of the helmet law by San Diego Police. A ticket for not having a helmet can range anywhere from $190 to $250. Even though it’s the law, many riders seem to be ignoring the helmet requirement.The scooter companies offer to send a free helmet to users, but as a practical matter, it may be difficult to persuade someone to refrain from a scooter ride, as they wait for a helmet to arrive.One Pacific Beach bike shop, “Swings and Things” has seized the opportunity to make a few extra bucks, by renting bike helmets to scooter riders for $5 a day. center_img June 6, 2018 Updated: 10:22 PM Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

In Other News City Rejects Tower Variance to Protect Dyess AFB School

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The city of Abilene’s Board of Adjustment unanimously denied a company’s request to vary the height of an existing telecommunications tower located about 9 miles from the south end of the runway at Dyess AFB, Texas, over concerns about its impact on the installation’s current and future missions. The proposed, 700-foot structure would have been 241 feet higher than the existing tower, reported the Abilene Reporter-News. Officials at Dyess AFB opposed the request, stating it would interfere with approach procedures. The FAA concluded the tower would not pose a hazard to aviation. … Redirecting federal impact aid funds into education savings accounts for military families — an idea now being promoted by the Heritage Foundation — would shortchange their children’s schooling while harming local school districts, according to an op-ed by Joyce Raezer, executive director of the National Military Family Association, and Hilary Goldmann, executive director of the National Association of Federally Impacted Schools. “This private school voucher scheme would undermine the work of public school districts, deny students (including students with disabilities, military-connected students and Native American students) legal protections, reduce accountability and burden taxpayers,” they state. … The Flint Hills Regional Council is hoping to obtain a $402,000 grant shortly from DOD’s Office of Economic Adjustment to implement recommendations from the updated joint land use study for Fort Riley, Kan., completed last year. The 2005 study failed to prompt significant changes, with officials citing the lack of specific recommendations for individual communities as a shortcoming, reports the Mercury.Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew Sarverlast_img read more

Dynamic Vision Sensor tech works like human retina

first_img Explore further Citation: Dynamic Vision Sensor tech works like human retina (2013, August 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-dynamic-vision-sensor-tech-human.html (Phys.org) —If technology expertise can advance artificial intelligence, what can we imagine for artificial vision? An interesting development in artificial vision comes from a Swiss company iniLabs. They have developed a camera that behaves like the human eye, based on the wonders of the human retina. Just as robotics developers take their cues from biology, this Swiss team has recognized how biology can inspire an alternative to conventional machine vision. The workings of the human eye require far less power than a digital camera would require and leave less information to be processed. Borrowing from the way the eye functions, the company has built a more efficient digital camera. Vision sensors keep their eye on the ball at Euro 2008 © 2013 Phys.orglast_img read more

Statistical study offers evidence of warning signs before Neolithic community collapse

first_img Citation: Statistical study offers evidence of warning signs before Neolithic community collapse (2016, August 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-08-statistical-evidence-neolithic-collapse.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the University of Maryland and the other with University College London has found that early Neolithic communities exhibited warning signs before collapsing. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sean Downey, W. Randall Haas, Jr. and Stephen Shennan describe the statistical analysis they conducted on data that has been collected through prior efforts from Neolithic communities that existed approximately 9,000 years ago and what they learned as a result. Knowing when a given community, town or city is about to collapse could prove useful in the future as the planet continues to warm—how such communities responded to stresses that have occurred in the past, the researchers found, may offer clues to the robustness of modern communities.The European Neolithic was a time of huge population growth as agriculture allowed people to move into larger and larger communities and that allowed for technological advancement as many people discovered they no longer needed to spend their days hunting or growing food. But it was also a time of instability as increased population densities allowed diseases to spread more easily. There was also war and the always problematic unpredictable weather. Sometimes, such events led to the total collapse of a community. But before that happened, the researchers with this new effort contend, there were warning signs.To learn more about societal collapse during the Neolithic, the researchers pored over papers documenting archeological digs looking for population numbers along with information regarding evidence of prior events that may have signaled coming trouble. The focus of their research was how communities had responded to stresses in their recent past. Those that were not able to fully recover between events, they noted, were at the most risk of total collapse when a new event occurred. They dubbed such events early warning signals (EWSs). They then tried the opposite approach, looking first for EWSs for a given community and then using them to try to predict whether a given community eventually collapsed—they report that they found such signals to be remarkably accurate. They suggest similar models could be used to help predict which if any modern communities may be in for a similar fate. Explore further More information: Sean S. Downey et al. European Neolithic societies showed early warning signals of population collapse, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1602504113AbstractEcosystems on the verge of major reorganization—regime shift—may exhibit declining resilience, which can be detected using a collection of generic statistical tests known as early warning signals (EWSs). This study explores whether EWSs anticipated human population collapse during the European Neolithic. It analyzes recent reconstructions of European Neolithic (8–4 kya) population trends that reveal regime shifts from a period of rapid growth following the introduction of agriculture to a period of instability and collapse. We find statistical support for EWSs in advance of population collapse. Seven of nine regional datasets exhibit increasing autocorrelation and variance leading up to collapse, suggesting that these societies began to recover from perturbation more slowly as resilience declined. We derive EWS statistics from a prehistoric population proxy based on summed archaeological radiocarbon date probability densities. We use simulation to validate our methods and show that sampling biases, atmospheric effects, radiocarbon calibration error, and taphonomic processes are unlikely to explain the observed EWS patterns. The implications of these results for understanding the dynamics of Neolithic ecosystems are discussed, and we present a general framework for analyzing societal regime shifts using EWS at large spatial and temporal scales. We suggest that our findings are consistent with an adaptive cycling model that highlights both the vulnerability and resilience of early European populations. We close by discussing the implications of the detection of EWS in human systems for archaeology and sustainability science.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Ancient dental plaque sheds new light on the diet of Mesolithic foragers in the Balkans A regime shift model of population growth rate variability, radiocarbon date calibration, and EWSs that demonstrates CSD in growth rates can be recovered from simulated SPDs. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1602504113 © 2016 Phys.orglast_img read more