Delon Armitage banned for three weeks

first_img“The player’s record, and the fact that he had recently returned from a period of suspension, was an aggravating feature which warranted an increase in that suspension by one week. READING, ENGLAND – MARCH 26: Delon Armitage of London Irish makes his return during the Aviva Premiership match between London Irish and Exeter at Madejski Stadium on March 26, 2011 in Reading, England. (Photo by Scott Heavey/Getty Images) Repeat offender – Delon ArmitageDELON ARMITAGE of London Irish was this evening banned for three weeks for striking Northampton Saints’ Stephen Myler with his hand during the Aviva Premiership match at the Madejski Stadium on April 23.Armitage, who pleaded guilty, was suspended from May 4 to May 10 and May 24 to June 6 by an RFU Disciplinary Panel of Jeremy Summers (chair), Philip Evans and Peter Budge.Summers: “This offence was assessed at being at the low end of the scale of seriousness, and as such led to an entry point suspension of two weeks. “The overall suspension of three weeks will not apply between May 8 and 23 as the player will have no games in that period.“He is accordingly ineligible to play from May 4 to May 10 and May 24 to June 6, and will not be able to have any match day involvement during those periods.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Italy A blast into Churchill Cup Plate final

first_img Men of the moment – Andrea Pratichetti of Italy A is tackled by Vasily ArtemyevItaly A 24Russia 19Italy A survived a second half Russian fightback to book their place in the Churchill Cup Plate final. The Azzurri led 18-6 at the break but they held on by their fingertips in the last 20 minutes to set up a showdown with Tonga at Sixways on Saturday.Senior Italian assistant coach Alessandra Troncon: “It was a very important to win because last week we lost to Canada. Russia are in our pool during the World Cup so to win is a good. The scrum saved us a few times so I think it as key for us today.”Russia face a Bowl final against their World Cup opponents USA and Bears’ boss Kingsley Jones said: “It’s a game we should have won. These lads can really play rugby but there was some naivety and not being street wise. But there are a lot of positives. A lot of the players showed what they can do in open space. The lineout improved but the scrum was an issue for us.”Italy led by nine at halftime thanks to tries from Matteo Pratichetti and Giulio Toniolatti, who went into the corner after a drive and deft offload from loosehead prop Alberto de Marchi. Russia had to rely on the boot of Yury Kushnarev, who kicked two penalties and then added a third early in the second half to close the gap to nine points.Tito Tebaldi landed a third penalty but then the tide turned as Russia scored the try of the match, a breakaway from their own 22 when Andrey Bykanov scooped up a loose ball, fed Kushnarev and when Rushan Yagudin took the ball on halfway he stepped out of the tackle and raced away. Scorers: Try: Yagudin; Pens: Kushnarev (4); Con:  Kushnarev.Referee: D Pearson (England)Att: 5357 With Tebaldi in the sinbin for killing the ball after Vasily Artemyev’s break, Riccardo Bocchino stretched the lead. Kushnarev failed with two attempts that could have put Russia right back into the game and was soon replaced by Anton Ryabov. Tebaldi missed a penalty and Russia almost hit the killer button when Alexander Shakirov made the break and only a last ditch tackle from Matteo Pratichetti stopped him delivering the final pass to Yagudin.Russia had a final crack with a freekick which they ran close to the Italian line but they could not capitalise and the chance was lost.Italy A: R Trevisan; G Toniolatti, A Pratichetti, A Pratichetti, M Sepe; R Bocchino, T Tebaldi; A De Marchi, T D’Aspice, F Staibano (D Christolini 47), J Furno, V Bernabo (capt M Bortolami 45), F Minto, M Bergamasco, M Vosawai. Reps (not used): A Manici, M Aguero, D Gerber G Venditti, N Belardo.Yellow card: Tebaldi 59-69Scorers: Tries: M Pratichetti, Toniolatti; Pens: Tebaldi (3),Bocchino; Con: Tebaldi; LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Russia: I Klyuchnikov; V Artemyev, M Babaev, S Trishin , R. Yagudin;  Y. Kushnarev (A Ryabov 70), A Bykanov (A Shakirov 66); G Tsnobiladze (A Travkin 49), V Tsnobiladze (V Korshunov 66), A Chernyshev (I Prishchepenko 49), A Panasenko, D Antonov, V Gresev, M Sidorov, V Grachev (capt, A Garbuzov 59). Rep (not used): I Galinovsky. GLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – JUNE 12: Andrea Pratichetti of Italy A is tackled by Vasily Artemyev during the Churchill Cup match between Italy A and Russia at Kingsholm on June 12, 2011 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)last_img read more

October Bargain Buys

first_imgWhen times are tough a bargain or two is just what you need to beat the financial blues. So Rugby World is coming to the rescue but scouring the web for some great bargains. This month we have swooped on three bargains – that we recommend – from rugbystore.co.uk, prodirectrugby.co.uk and lovell-rugby.co.uk. Grab them while they are still available!Slick Nicks – Optimum Nicks are now just £6.99/£8.99 (RRP £10.99/£12.99) from rugbystore.co.uk Knock down NZ – A tournament hoodie from lovell-rugby.co.uk will now set you back just £9.99 (RRP £39.99).  What are you waiting for?Head Cuts – Pick up a Gilbert Atomic headguard for £14.99 (RRP £24.99) from prodirectrugby.co.uk LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

Wallabies focusing on own injury problems with Folau a major doubt for Wales game

first_img Australia are not concerned about Wales’s lengthy injury list, with coach Michael Cheika suffering with a few key absentees himself.Mercurial full-back Israel Folau is likely to miss the game with an ankle injury, while winger Rob Horne looks set to miss out with a shoulder problem.Then there’s Michael Hooper, who was cited for foul play after the England game and will face a hearing this week to decide his fate.“We saw [Wales] picked up a couple of injuries against England but those guys who came in made an impact and the guys who had to start last week against Fiji did really well,” said Wallabies’ attack coach Stephen Larkham.“Rob’s in doubt for this week and most likely he won’t play and the other injury concern is Izzy. He came off the field in the game with a sore ankle and didn’t train yesterday so we’ll see how he pulls up today and whether he trains. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Should Australia win, however, Wales would face the mammoth task of facing South Africa in the quarters, before a likely encounter with New Zealand in the semi-final and the Wallabies could again be waiting in the final. “To turn it around, with our squad, they are pretty significant injuries so we are focusing internally and not on the problems the other team has.”Reports suggest that Kurtley Beale is favourite to step into Folau’s position at the back and veteran winger Drew Mitchell will replace Horne out wide.With both teams already guaranteed progression to the knock-out stages, the game at Twickenham on Saturday afternoon still has a great deal at stake. Should Wales prevail against Australia they would get an easier run to the final, with a probably quarter-final against Scotland at Twickenham.center_img Israel Folau and Rob Horne look set to miss Australia’s crunch game with Wales on Saturday, while Michael Hooper faces a possible suspension Israel Folau against England at the 2015 World Cup last_img read more

Wasps back-row James Haskell

first_imgGet to know the gregarious Wasp as he discusses DJing, diggers and dinner party guests Buzzing: James Haskell shows off his personality at a photo shoot. Photo: Getty Images TAGS: Wasps Oooh, that’s a tough one. I’d start with Ricky Gervais because I like his sense of humour. Then I’d have Arnold Schwarzenegger just because he’s Arnie! Finally, I would have to go with Floyd Mayweather or Conor McGregor – let’s pick Floyd. He’s 50 and 0. Legend.Do you have any hidden talents?Well, I love driving diggers, if that’s a hidden talent. I’ll be getting my digger driving licence soon. I’vebeen obsessed with JCBs since I was a young child. They’re lending me one for six months and I’m going to drive it to training. I can’t wait.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREWhat annoys you?Well, you can get in trouble on Twitter. There are so many potholes on there.Who would you least like to be stuck in a lift with?It would have to be that girl who writes a load of nonsense in the Daily Mail, what’s her name… yeah, Katie Hopkins.What’s your guilty pleasure?I DJ in my spare time. I like getting on the decks and playing to the crowd. And, on the quiet, I’m a complete Harry Potter nause as well. I know far too much about the books!What would you like to achieve outside of rugby?World domination… nah, let’s go for something a bit more modest. I’d like to be a Hollywood movie star! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS James Haskell, the irrepressible Wasps stalwart, made his international debut back in 2007 and is now England’s third most-capped back-row behind Lawrence Dallaglio (85 Tests) and Joe Worsley (78). Here he takes time out for an offbeat chat with Rugby World …Do you have any phobias?I’m not scared of much. In Australia last year I held a giant tarantula, which I could cope with, and in the house if I saw a dead bird or a mouse, I’d be able to deal with it. But if I had bugs crawling up my arm, I wouldn’t like it much.What are your nicknames?Hask is the most commonly used, but obviously to the younger guys in the squad it’s Sir or Mr Haskell. Ha ha!The SLT: Josh Bassett makes a break for Wasps. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s the funniest nickname at Wasps?There are plenty but we signed the BLT during the summer – Paul Doran-Jones. It stands for Big, Lean and Tanned. Then there’s his sidekick, SLT. That’s Josh Bassett, who’s Skinny, Lean and Tanned.Who are the squad jokers at Wasps?I have to say Briefcase, Elliot Daly. That boy is like a giant child. I thought when he got engaged recently that it might make him more sensible, but it’s the opposite. He pranks me, jumps out at me and shouts at me. He’s been driving me absolutely mad lately.Are there any practical jokes you can share with the public?Oh, the usual. You come into training and find shoes on the roof. The last one was Joe Simpson deciding to put two boiled eggs in my brand-new boots. Thanks for that, mate.What’s been your most embarrassing moment, on or off the field?There’s a laundry list of them but the one I get the most grief for is running into the post against Wales in the Six Nations last year. The fact ten million people were watching meant I couldn’t really get away with it. People loved that and don’t stop reminding about it.Invite: Arnold Schwarzenegger is one of Haskell’s dream dinner guests. Photo: Getty ImagesWho would be your three dream guests for a dinner party – and why? This article first appeared in the December 2017 issue of Rugby Worldlast_img read more

State high court won’t reconsider decision against Falls Church Anglican

first_img Lisa Fox says: June 14, 2013 at 4:13 pm Wonderful that this is finally coming to a resolution and both groups can move on with their lives and their ministries. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Property Comments (22) Doug Desper says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA June 14, 2013 at 4:23 pm It is very encouraging and satisfying to see the Courts affirm the fact that ALL OF US GAVE OUR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH and not to the Local Parish!! We were and still are Episcopalians.Thanks for the good reporting, keep it up.!!Al Lingo. Stockton,Calif.St. Anne’s Episcopal Church. Bruce Bogin says: June 14, 2013 at 5:01 pm It never ceases to amaze me that congregations that don’t want to be affiliated with The Episcopal Church still want the property. Makes me think that it’s all (or mostly) about the property, not about a belief that they’re willing to support with sacrifice and starting anew, including in new spaces.Genie Carr(parishioner) St. Paul’s, Winston-Salem, NC Submit a Job Listing Lucia Lloyd says: Greg Brown says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Grant Carson says: June 14, 2013 at 5:31 pm Congrats. Yet another reason I fled the Episcopal church like hundreds of others. Kudos. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 14, 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Al Lingo says: June 15, 2013 at 11:44 am Before all the unpleasantness the Falls Church was a leading Episcopal church that was held up in their Diocese and across the Church as an example of meaningful and measurable growth and vitality. They were relied on and bragged about. In the meantime they have searched the Scriptures beyond superficial meanings and have found many decisions by leading revisionists greatly lacking and increasingly they found that they were marginalized. They are gone and will not be back. So, the campus – built by their energy and funds – is left to a much, much smaller group who will be fortunate to muster 200 people this Sunday and also pay for its ongoing survival. In my own church the family of the 1920s founders (Episcopalian missionaries) and about 1/3 of the long-term supporters have left the Church of their youth, middle, and older age. Thousands more are leaving, dioceses are quitting and splitting. South Carolina is gone. We now number just below 2 million with perhaps 600,000 showing up. This is not victory. Stuff without people? Property to be used for what?We must find a day – very soon – when the General Convention Bucket List undertaken by today’s leading progressive revisionists will become healing and less divisive and stop irritating people out of their own churches. June 26, 2013 at 1:50 pm Is it any wonder why despite their claims of exponential growth in developing countries, churches of the “puritanical” kind almost always had doors slammed to their faces whenever they conduct their house to house literature crusade or people leaving their evangelical meetings without the assurance of returning and coming forward at the next altar call? It’s because for many people, especially those already born and raised as christians-even if nominally baptized, all these sanctimonious posturing, bible thumping preaching and repeated questions of “are you saved and prepared for the rapture?” Are meaningless to those who earn less than half a dollar and eat only one plate of decent meal–and by decent means scrap left overs from restaurant bins recooked as meat balls and rice congies–a day, and they find all these imported bible preachers on t.v. shows and airconditioned churches and hotel convention centers, and their affluent flocks offering each other for a ride to their bible study venues when they had their own luxury cars waiting at the parking lot makes them cringe and shake their heads at the hypocrisy of their apparent holiness and yet lacking the substance of compassion and justice for the poor and the oppressed. So for me all these sanctimonious posturing really means nothing to me but a bunch of holier than thou rantings of armchair theologians and moralists who have all the time and leisure in their hands to make their “concerted” effort at re-aligning the axis of the anglican communion in their favor in playing the persecuted martyr role in the mainland while orchestrating the manipulative game of hoisting the “bait” on sympathetic clergies and churches in the global south who are gullibly of the same mind as they are and are too eager to grab on the offer and enjoy the perks of becoming part of the global south realignment of the anglican communion… and also of the sharing of its blessings (and this includes church properties and assests). Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 2, 2013 at 12:44 am Truly, as what an old anticolonial saying goes on to say, “when america sneezes, the world catches cold,” or in the case of these disgruntled conservative anglican schismatics and their allies in their global south realignment agenda, “when they rock the anglican titanic, they assume those belonging to the lower decks would also join them in rocking the boat.” Well they can have can have the sinking ship if that’s what they want. But their bitterness over defeat in church property squabbles only serves to confirm that for all their so called moral righteousness posturings and calls for biblical crusade for anglican orthodoxy only matters so much to them as it concerns their own properties and vested interests with no connection or even an afterthought on what these will have on the credibility of anglicanism to episcopal churches in the (under)developed world. They might have not realized it but they ought to consider themselves lucky for having all these consultations, discussions, debates and time for discernments on these issues over spanning decades, issues that are actually ephemeral but now they strive to elevate to the level of a creed or dogma, issues that third world peoples find so trivial that they can only sratch their heads and sigh how come these affluent people sitting comfortably in their churches can make a proverbial mountain out of a molehill when people here exclaim “if it ain’t filling an empty stomach, it’s plain useless” for many of them can’t even think of praying to God or even think about the morality as they literally move heaven and earth just to have a taste of a descent meal for their family or finding a shelter or place to lay their weary and hungry bodies when evening thunderstorms drive them away from their cardboard shanties on sidewalks; where such issues aren’t even matters of life and death as what increasing numbers of pastors, priests and even bishops from catholics to protestant churches experienced for themselves for daring to defend the rights of poor farmers and ancestral domains of marginalized indigenous peoples receiving threats of harrasment, abductions, illegal detentions, torture and murder from hired death squads and underground paramilitary groups roaming the countryside. It’s a shame how people of faith are blinded over parrochial issues that they forgot to open their eyes and see that the episcopal church and the anglican communion does not revolve around nor exist solely for them or their agendas, there’s a whole wide world out here challenging first world churches to stop bickering like spoiled children deprived of their choco chip cookies and start acting like compassionate adults in reaching out to their less fortunate brothers and sisters still struggling to survive and live descently on the other (underdeveloped) side of the episcopal-anglican world. Susan Alves Haywood Lunardini says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Genie Carr says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 July 25, 2016 at 11:16 am Hi Susan,I don’t know if you’ll see this, as it is now 2016, but my family went to Falls Church for several years in the 1950’s. And I well remember your Uncle Hodge as the Alves were friends of my mom and dad, Ozzie and Addy Lynch. Both of them are passed away. and I did not keep in touch. But, I saw this and thought I’d reply. Have a great day. Ryan Hall says: Rector Albany, NY June 19, 2013 at 9:54 pm I am glad that the Falls Church is being returned to the faithful Episcopalians who have built up this church in a long tradition since the Revolutionary War. I am sad that some reactionaries have followed their own “purity movement” to leave TEC. No one kicked them out. The “conservatives” could have remained in the Church and their building. But, no. They had to declare their “purity” and declare all others as “unclean” or even “heretical.” It was their hubris that made them take this step which has now cost them the building that ALL the Episcopalians have built. How very sad. If they had remained together, I expect this will blow over in another 10 years or so. The schismatics of the purity sect have no one to blame but themselves. Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Grant Carson says: Sheri Mason says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN June 26, 2013 at 10:59 pm Wow! I’m not a sanctimonious bible thumper going from door to door and handing out tracts. My church is Rite I Anglo-Catholic. But you’re right insofar as I believe the Great Commission is enduring, having been commanded by Christ, and can’t be replaced by a U.N. resolution.Incindentally, did you know there are more earned doctorates in theology in the Church of Nigeria than there are in the Church of England? Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Grant Carson says: Comments are closed. Gilbert Martinez says: Kathy Richardson says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listingcenter_img June 30, 2013 at 10:25 pm Wow, you’re really angry! (And off the subject.) Rector Martinsville, VA June 21, 2013 at 5:51 am I guess what bothers me about your comment is your supposition that whatever Jesus is alleged to have said about marriage in the first century, 2,000 years ago, is cast in concrete as God’s will for all time. It does not take into account that Jesus was willing to break rules when it suited him, as in the several examples when he healed on the Sabbath and was taken to task for so doing by the synogogue leaders. The Jesus in whom I believe and whom I worship was in my view and above all a man of compassion. He truly felt for others. I think that He very well may have come to different conclusion today after 2,000 years of learning. CHUCK EVANS says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Doug Desper says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Doug Desper says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group State high court won’t reconsider decision against Falls Church Anglican Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab June 17, 2013 at 11:55 am Bruce –I hasten to add to your comments that the perfection of the Law, Jesus Christ, is the one to look to. The journey of Israel’s becoming a faithful people found in the OT is not a cookbook for how to do everything right. Errant relationships, relationships being corrected, obedience, fallacies, faithlessness, and hope are all there in the OT as a record of the journey towards faithfulness, but it is illogical to point towards their mistakes as definitive of God’s will. King David was faithful and the apple of God’s eye, but not when he misled and caused murder. Abram rode on a saddle containing idols while worshipping the One God, and eventually tossed his idols aside. Does that mean that we look at his idol worship and copy it? No. We look instead to his maturing in the faith when he became more fully obedient and faithful. Moments of idolatry, murder, polygamy, etc. are not definitive but the evidence of a people who were being changed. With regards to marriage, look to the perfection of the Law and the hope of Israel; there is absolutely no ambiguity from the mouth of Jesus Christ. In Matthew 19 (Jesus quotes Genesis 2): “Haven’t you read,” he replied, “that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’ and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’?” The Lord has clearly declared the will of God for marriage by reminding us of God’s design in the beginning. Since then humanity – including Israel in Scripture – has used human reason to justify doing something else. The will of God hasn’t changed no matter how many reasonable people say so. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL June 14, 2013 at 8:24 pm I read the news with a sense of relief. All parishes should review articles of incorporation to make sure it is clearly stated the property belongs ultimately to the Diocese. It is sometimes difficult to locate a copy of the articles. I recommend the appointment of a parish chancellor. This should be a lawyer with a local practice who can keep track of legal papers while rectors and vestry members come and go. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS June 17, 2013 at 8:37 am There was a time when people used the Bible to support their view that slavery was proper. Later, these people used the Bible to support their view that segregation and treatment of black people as third-class citizens was proper. There was a time when people used the Bible to support their view that divorced people could not be remarried in the Church. There was a time, and sadly, it still exists, when people used the Bible to support their view that woman were not equal to men and that they should not be permitted to serve as priests and bishops. Today people use the Bible to support their views that homosexuals should be excluded from priesthood in the Church. Over the centuries many people have learned that the teachings of the Bible should be interpreted in the light of our scientific learning and the broadening of our understanding that ALL people are equal in Christ, and that ALL people should be treated the same. To rely on the Bible as supporting discrimination against groups of people because of their color, their gender or their sexual orientation is nothing but bigotry wrapped in Scripture to make it palatable and excusable. I would far rather be the very last person in an Episcopal Church which loves and treats ALL people as one in Jesus Christ than ally myself with those who smugly practice bigotry in His name and with their Bibles clutched under their arms. A church which discriminates against groups of people is a church in name only. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Gilbert Martinez says: June 21, 2013 at 8:01 pm Bruce –Jesus reiterated Genesis 2 (one man -one woman united in marriage) at the beginning of the Common Era after a few thousand years of humanity’s self-exalting experimentation into other relational options: polygamy, bridal slavery, same-sex relationships, demands for divorce, arranged marriages, and many other guises. Interesting that after a few thousand years of such deformities that He simply returned to the beginning. It’s all been tried – it’s all been excused away – it’s all been a disaster. He calls us to return to God’s design. Modern humanity hasn’t come into anything new; however some among us involve themselves in the latest version of an old story of self-deception that seeks to be disobedient to the will of God. Jesus didn’t “break the rules” on this one. It’s crystal clear. His words, not mine. So, the question: are we a Church that believes that His words are Gospel or that He is just an enlightened teacher of that time? Do we believe that human tradition and reason trump Scripture? Some believe so, and that’s why we’re bleeding members, closing parishes, losing whole dioceses, shuttering cathedrals, and merging seminaries. The path of listening with itching ears to teachers we accumulate is costing the Church. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA June 15, 2013 at 8:41 am My Uncle, Rev. J. Hodge Alves, was rector of the Fallls Church for over twenty years. I did not even know ownership was in contention. He authored a book about Falls Church. I have strong feeling about both sides of this coin. Uncle Hodge was a 15th generation Episcopalian and always felt the honor of serving in this historic place. Unity is hard for many Episcopalians when new thought seems to them to be contrary to Canon by which they learned their faith. We lost so many actual buiding and property when the American Revolution ended and perhaps their properties were still in doubt. We all worship one Lord, one Savior, and pray the Holy Spirit will guide us to provide the same faith to our children and to others that was so freely given to us. Bruce Bogin says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 June 24, 2013 at 11:10 pm “I am glad that the Falls Church is being returned to the faithful Episcopalians who have built up this church in a long tradition since the Revolutionary War.” You surely got that wrong! The faithful Episcopalians who built up the church are the ones that left. The ones that remained WERE FEWER THAN ONE PERCENT.And “apostate” may be a better description than “heretical.” June 27, 2013 at 8:59 pm Beautifully said!!!!!!!! What a beautiful reflection of Christ you are. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Gilbert Martinez says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Episcopal News Service] In a one-sentence order issued June 14, the Virginia Supreme Court denied a request from The Falls Church Anglican to rehear its earlier decision reaffirming a circuit court ruling that returned The Falls Church property to loyal Episcopalians to use for the  mission of the Diocese of Virginia and the Episcopal Church.The denial sends the case back to the Fairfax County Circuit Court for final resolution of issues related to personal property.“The decision by the Supreme Court is about much more than litigation,” Virginia Bishop Shannon S. Johnston said in a diocesan press release. “This decision is an occasion for all those, on both sides, to focus fully on positive ministries ahead.”The Rev. John Ohmer, rector of The Falls Church Episcopal, said that he and his congregation are “relieved by this decision and looking forward to turning a new page.The Rev. Deacon Edward W. Jones, secretary of the diocese, called the decision “an affirming one,” adding that the diocese is “looking to the future with gratefulness and optimism.”The Falls Church Anglican has not yet commented on the ruling.The Falls Church was one of 11 congregations in the diocese in which a majority of members voted to disaffiliate from the diocese and the Episcopal Church. Over the years, all but The Falls Church Anglican had settled their property conflicts with the diocese and the church after judicial decisions in favor of the diocese and the church.The June 14 ruling is the latest in a long series in the dispute.After a Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge ordered The Falls Church Anglican in March 2012 to return the parish property to the diocese, the Anglicans only agreed to allow the Episcopalians to return to the parish building to celebrate Easter (April 8, 2012).However, the Anglican congregation soon thereafter appealed to the state Supreme Court and in the meantime asked the Circuit Court to prevent the Episcopalians from returning again until the high court ruled. The Circuit Court refused and the Falls Church Episcopalians returned to their property on May 15, 2012.On April 18 of this year, the Virginia Supreme Court affirmed the circuit court ruling returning the Falls Church property to the Episcopalians. It was this ruling that The Falls Church Anglican asked the court to reconsider, despite earlier comments by the Rev. John Yates, The Falls Church Anglican’s rector, on April 28 that the Supreme Court’s “overwhelming rejection of our arguments … reduces our legal options drastically.”And in his weekly message for the week of May 19, Yates said: “We have received further confirmation that the courts are not likely to reverse last year’s ruling.” He explained why the congregation’s leaders are “willing to lose our property and move ahead into an uncertain, unclear future.”However, on May 17, the Anglican congregation petitioned the state Supreme Court for a rehearing on its April 18 decision. The petition argued that the justices mistakenly based that ruling on a legal theory that “has never — in over six years of litigation — been pled, argued, briefed, or proven” by the Episcopal Church or the Diocese of Virginia.The court’s June 14 order did not address The Falls Church Anglican claims.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC June 15, 2013 at 1:20 pm Godspeed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ June 28, 2013 at 9:54 am I’ve heard one too many of clergy reactions as to why evangelicalism (of the militant puritanical kind) don’t get much of an attention in the local episcopal churches in the philippines but often end up lumped together with the bible fundie sects for their elitism and aloofness to the social realities of this country. One even confided that after attending one of those global south to south encounters, they felt more like puppets with incentives offered just to have their presence (and ofcourse their signatures and photo ops) and add credence to their agendas of realignment. And for this reason many of them declined to have any further contacts with that group and unanimously agreed with the synod in rejecting the proposed anglican covenant and renewed the covenant of partnership with the episcopal church. All those talk of morality and alignment only works within the walls of seminary classrooms and had no real bearings on the lives of majority of the people who had seldom heard about anglicanism much less its exotic evangelical variety limited to filipino chinese anglicans whose ministers aren’t even graduates of local seminary but had to be imported all the way from singapore (hence the derisive term “singapore virus” applied to clerics coming into contact and spreading their brand of anglicanism among majority of local episcopalians born and raised in the anglo-catholic tradition). Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA June 28, 2013 at 6:41 pm South Carolina is NOT gone. Only the “lower Diocese.” 50% of Episcopalians in South Carolina are in the Diocese of Upper South Carolina. The one that lost most of its churches are in the Diocese of South Carolina made up of most missions and parishes.In the Upper Diocese only one parish in Spartanburg and one mission elsewhere have left the ECUSA.last_img read more

Central Gulf Coast Bishop Duncan announces retirement plan

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Central Gulf Coast Bishop Duncan announces retirement plan Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET People The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA By ENS StaffPosted Aug 5, 2013 Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA House of Bishops, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN center_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Elections, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service] Diocese of the Central Gulf Bishop Philip M. Duncan II has announced that he plans to retire two years from now and has called for the election of his successor.Duncan has served the Pensacola, Florida-based diocese as its third bishop since May 2001. He turns 70 in December and by the time of his retirement will have been ordained for 45 years. The Episcopal Church requires all clergy and bishops to retire when they reach the age of 72.“I have fought both with the angels and the demons and believe I have reached this place of relative peace (not calm),” Duncan wrote of his decision. “I am facing the call to retire and seeking a new way of being a bishop. My decision to retire has been liberating and empowering.”Duncan said his successor would be consecrated on July 25, 2015. That date will mark the start of his retirement, he said.The diocese was formed in 1970 by combining the southern part of the Diocese of Alabama and the western section of the Diocese of Florida. While the diocesan offices are in Pensacola, the diocesan cathedral, Christ Church, is in Mobile, Alabama. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Episcopal churches put their hearts into Valentine’s Day

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Margie Bowman says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 14, 2014 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Tickie Shull, ECW president at Trinity Episcopal Church, Newark, Ohio (L) and Linda Dimon hold Valentine cookies to be taken to homebound parishioners. Bonnie John also participated in the effort as did Billie Richey who is holding Valentines cards by the Sunday School classes.Photo: Carol Morello/Trinity Episcopal Church[Episcopal News Service] If Valentine’s is a day for love, then Episcopal churches are spreading it around.Like the “Have a Heart” fundraising campaign in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, for the Church of the Redeemer’s African Children’s Mission (ACM) ministry to Malawi.Or the cookie outreach launched by the Episcopal Church Women at Trinity Church in Newark, Ohio — home-baked cookies for homebound seniors.Couples are planning to renew their wedding vows at many Episcopal churches, including St. Alban’s Church in St. Pete Beach, Florida and at the Church of the Heavenly Rest in New York City.Trinity Church in Fort Worth is offering a free Parents Night Out and St. Stephen’s Church in Santa Clarita, California, crafted cards and heartfelt messages for local seniors and singles.So, who was St. Valentine?Given that the Roman Catholic Church in 1996 demoted his saintly status and the Episcopal Church recognizes others on Feb. 14 (saints Cyril and Methodius), it isn’t all that clear who St. Valentine or Valentinius actually was or why a day devoted to romantic love, roses and chocolates became his namesake, according to the Rev. Sam A. Portaro.“There was possibly more than one character named Valentine,” according to Portaro, who retired in 2004 after 22 years as Episcopal chaplain at the University of Chicago.Portaro’s Feb. 14 meditation in his “The Brightest and the Best” (Cowley Publications, 1998) companion reader to Lesser Feasts and Fasts, the Episcopal Church’s calendar of saints doesn’t mention Valentine, but concentrates on Cyril and Methodius instead.“Some people trace the influence of Chaucer as helping to elevate the prominence of Valentine, and associating him with love,” Portaro added. “In that period he is associated with courtly love which, as we know, is a very romantic view of love that’s not grounded in reality.”The Rev. Tim Schenck agreed. “It’s, frankly, a bit odd that love is celebrated on a day named for St. Valentinus,” said Schenck, rector of St. John the Evangelist Church in Hingham, Massachusetts.“If you want to celebrate Valentine’s Day with authenticity, try dressing up for your romantic dinner as the martyred saint,” said Schenck who has been known to reflect about the holy ones in annual Lent Madness “saintly smackdown” he helps run, set to resume March 6, where viewers pick their most favorite saints.“Or perhaps just stick with chocolate and roses and tell your beloved about Saints Cyril and Methodius – the 9th century missionaries to the Slavs whom the Episcopal Church actually commemorates on February 14th,” he added.Some traditions identify Valentine as a priest; others, a bishop. “Most of them tend to center on a character who lived in the 3rd century and was around under the persecution of Emperor Claudius II and there are stories of his martyrdom and his life tends to have been centered largely around Rome,” Portaro said.He compared ninth century Russian brothers Cyril and Methodius, missionaries in the area that became Czechoslovakia who invented the Cyrillic alphabet and made liturgy and worship available in the language of that region, to modern-day Canadian brothers Alexandre and Frederic Bilodeau.Alexandre Bilodeau, who won the gold medal in freestyle skiing Feb.10 at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia,Saints Cyril and Methodiousdedicated the victory to his older brother Frederic who has cerebral palsy, Portaro said.“They’re such an icon of genuine love, the kind of love that we really do want to lift up and celebrate, a kind of selfless love of one human being for another,” he said. He noted that “Alex clearly and openly identifies his older brother Frederic as his hero.”He said that the two brothers “exhibit such a beautiful example of the kind of love we should have for all of our relationships but especially in marriage” and that the missionaries Cyril and Methodius’ selfless work “is far more representative of the kind of love we want to lift up within the Christian community than any of the mythologies associated with Valentine.”Bryn Mawr: ‘Have a Heart’ campaign for AIDS orphansSince Julie Williams has a heart for helping children orphaned by AIDS in the African nation of Malwai, she hopes others will, too.This Valentine’s weekend, she helped to launch an appeal to raise money for the African Children’s Ministry (ACM) of the Church of the Redeemer in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania.For example, a mere $10 will provide a year’s worth of school supplies for two children orphaned by AIDS. There are an estimated 550,000 orphans in Malawi, according to the fundraiser flyer.Just $75 treats one hundred pregnant women for malaria at the Global AIDS International Alliance (GAIA) mobile health clinics. GAIA is a parent organization of the ACM.And for the $160 investment of paying the room and board of a nursing scholar, the returns are amazing—increased healthcare capacity in the AIDS-challenged country.“Our fundraiser just happened to crop up at about the right time and we thought it was a natural, an easy message to have a heart and give at this time,” Williams told ENS.Throughout the year, the ACM committee also organizes trips to Malawi and other fundraisers, including for a “GOT GOAT” food empowerment project, said the Rev. Stephen Billings, who convenes the ministry.The ACM involves an ongoing relationship with an exchange of people between the U.S. and Malawi, Billings said.The ministry has been incorporated as Sunday school lessons “and demonstrating how assisting the needs of the children of Malawi and their families relates to the millennium development goals,” Billings said.“What we’re talking about, when we talk about sending Valentines to Malawi, is medical packs, bike ambulances, children’s feeding programs and school scholarships, malaria nets and other related services for the well-being and the stability of families with a priority on children who are already orphans who are at risk,” he said.“We’re talking about training nurses; there’s a dearth of nurses. GAIA has a program for scholarships and support for several generations of nurses trained primarily in Malawai, but several are trained in this country.”Billings said he’s also known as “the goat man” because he gives a token plastic goat to donors as a reminder to people of gifts to Malawi.Fort Worth: a ‘Valent-erific’ night out for parents and in for their childrenErin Martin said she and her husband Josh don’t get many nights out and so she was really excited when she learned that Trinity Church in Fort Worth was offering a free Parents Night Out for Valentine’s Day.“My kids really like it there,” she said of the church. “They enjoy the programs and feel comfortable and we feel comfortable leaving them, so I was excited that we could all be part of it without anyone being mad. The kids were happy and we were happy,” said the stay-at-home mom with three children, aged 4, 8, and 10.Kimberly Cooper, the church’s children’s ministry coordinator, said 30 children are signed up so that, while their parents get a night out on the town, they’ll have a fun night in of their own.The idea for the event all came about “when we realized that Valentine’s Day was on a Friday. We thought, wouldn’t it be great to give parents the night out?” recalled Sarah Martinez, church communications coordinator.The evening starts at 5:30 p.m. and will include games, a condensed Godly Play lesson about God’s love for all creation, and an opportunity to make heart-shaped bird feeders by mixing gelatin and birdseed, Cooper said. “They’ll be able to take them home and hang them outside to feed the birds,” she said.The event, also an outreach to the church’s preschool families and promises to be “a Valentin-terific evening for all,” Martinez said.As for Martin, “we’re going to try and go out to dinner,” she said. “We don’t get many nights out, not just for fun. We have people we can ask to watch our kids but we use that up on things that we have to do. This is more like something we get to do. We can go and spend time and enjoy ourselves and I don’t feel like I’m inconveniencing anyone.“We really enjoy the program,” she said, adding “it’s a good service to the community.”Cookies and Cards, oh my!This year, Tickie Shull and other Episcopal Church Women members at Trinity Church in Newark, Ohio weren’t content with just baking dozens of sugary treats with lots of pink icing and tasty sprinkles; they made their annual Valentine’s Day outreach a multigenerational effort.“Our Sunday school kids made cards that are as cute as can be,” Shull told ENS. “They have Valentine spelled out vertically and then it’s says John 3:16 horizontally. And they put a special message inside: ‘from the Trinity children. You are so loved. Happy Valentine’s Day.’”The handmade cards go with the homemade heart-shaped cookies that go to housebound seniors who seldom, if ever, get to church, she said. “It’s just been something that’s been appreciated and it’s been fun to do.”“And, it’s always a team effort,” Shull said. “It’s a joy. We like our ministries. We just want to spread the love. Valentine’s Day is all about love, right? Well, that is what we are trying to do, to just spread it around.”Similarly, Kimberlee Bridgeford got together with a couple of other parishioners at St. Stephen’s Church in Santa Clarita, California to make about 130 Valentine cards “for shut-ins and single people and senior citizens and newcomers.A scrapbooker, it was second nature for Bridgeford to amass ribbons and stickers and rubber stamps and three-dimensional lace, and all the accoutrements for fancy embossed cards and heart-felt messages. She worked with Rosa Holdredge and Wendy Rickman on decorative cards, bookmarks and envelopes.“We did them all by hand and then we had another 70 that we embellished and put bookmarks in. We gave those to the Canterbury Village retirement home adjacent to the church property, for the residents,” she said.Bridgeford said she began the practice after her own mother passed away two years ago. She missed receiving her mom’s card, Bridgeford recalled.“One parishioner told me she hadn’t received a Valentine since she was in grade school and she’s 70 years old,” Bridgeford told ENS. “Everyone needs to feel loved and thought of. We want them to know we do care, that this is not just a Hallmark holiday. This is letting people know we care about them.”Now, mission accomplished, all the cards done and in the process of being delivered, she reflects. “We had a wonderful time. And I can’t wait to find out what everybody felt when they got their cards.”Each card is unique and “every one is made with love,” she added.Vows renewed, deeper, stronger loveErnie McKenzie, 72, says the idea of renewing their vows has always appealed to him and his wife Anna, 71. After 17 years of marriage they will join other couples at 6 p.m. on Valentine’s Day at St. Alban’s Church in St. Pete Beach in southwest Florida for vows, snacks and champagne.“It’s a way to not necessarily rekindle but to relive those same feelings and what they meant to us back then, and now, and hopefully will mean the same forever,” he said.Similarly, in New York City, at least a dozen couples will gather at 6:30 p.m. at the Church of the Heavenly Rest for what the Rev. Matthew Heyd, rector, is calling “a short service of thanksgiving and renewal of marriage vows” open to the community and followed by a champagne reception in the narthex.“It’s a wonderful way that we observe the sacred part of people’s lives,” Heyd told ENS. “We hope it will be both meaningful and fun. We’re encouraging people to bring their children. Last year, people had their kids come and watched them renew their wedding vows.”“It’s a way to lift up the blessing of the sacrament of marriage and to honor the time that people spent together. It’s a remarkable thing to look back on commitment they made whether it is one year or 50 years and to ponder how in joy and difficulty they’ve been together.”A lot of their relationship was physical when they first married, McKenzie said of he and Anna, “but, as time progresses, it becomes a lot deeper. You gain a lot more respect for your partner. You get to the point where the physical doesn’t mean that much anymore, but the ability to be there for your partner means everything.”And that’s exactly the sentiment the Rev. Georgene “Gigi” Conner, priest-in-charge at St. Alban’s is hoping to acknowledge on Valentine’s Day.“We’re expressing a deeper commitment,” Conner said. “The hope is that when people stay together, love becomes deeper.  You get over romantic love and get into the deeper meaning of what love really is. We see it occasionally in couples where one person has become very ill and the other does not abandon them but is right by their side.“Or, there’s a huge adjustment for people who’ve gone off to war and come back and they’re somewhat changed and how do you nurture that person back to wholeness and that can be done through love rather than just saying it’s not going to work. We livein a society of quick fixes, where we think everything’s going to happen right now rather than staying in it for the long haul.”Ernie McKenzie said the day promises to bring both tears and smiles.“It’s just, there’s a closeness that we have that you never seem to be able to show,” he said. “Even though we talk about it, something like renewing our vows gives you something to be able to show that you really do care and that your mate really is number one.“Renewing our vows to us is just saying that we’re willing to commit for another 17 years or however long. Our feelings are just as strong as they’ve ever been, even though they may be a little different.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service.   Comments are closed. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC February 18, 2014 at 6:21 am So proud of Trinity Episcopal Church, Newark, OH Episcopal churches put their hearts into Valentine’s Day An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

Los diputados eligen a 13 síndicos del Fondo de Pensiones…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Los diputados eligen a 13 síndicos del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia y a dos clérigos del Consejo Ejecutivo Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] La Cámara de Diputados eligió el 28 de junio a 13 síndicos del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia y a dos clérigos como miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo.Los seis miembros laicos del Consejo Ejecutivo serán electos cuando la Cámara de Diputados se reúna nuevamente el 29 de junio.Las personas elegidas como síndicos del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia fueron:Martha Bedell Alexander, Diócesis de Carolina del Norte.Muy Rdo. Tracey Lind, Diócesis de Ohio.Brian Prior, Diócesis de Minnesota.Thomas James Brown, Diócesis de Massachusetts.Sandra Swan, Diócesis de Carolina Oriental.Margaret A. Niles, Diócesis de Olympia.Canóniga Anne M. Vickers, Diócesis del Sudeste de la Florida.Gregory H. Rickel, Diócesis de Olympia.Canóniga Sandye A. Wilson, Diócesis de Newark.Tim Mitchell, Diócesis de Kentucky.Sandra F. McPhee, Diócesis de Chicago.Kevin B. Lindahl, Diócesis de Colorado.Clifton Daniel III, Diócesis de Pensilvania.Los síndicos del Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia desempeñan un papel en el gobierno y la supervisión del Grupo de Pensiones de la Iglesia, que incluye al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia y varias filiales. Los síndicos toman decisiones que afectan la estrategia de inversión, las políticas de pensión y los beneficios y otros servicios del Grupo de Pensiones de la Iglesia.Los dos clérigos electos como miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo fueron:Canóniga Mally Ewing Lloyd, Diócesis de Massachusetts.Jabriel Simmonds Ballentine, Diócesis de Florida Central.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4(1). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio].La Convención General está considerando propuestas de reducir el tamaño del Comité Ejecutivo.— Tracy J. Sukraw es parte del equipo de Episcopal News Service que está reportando desde la Convención. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Por Tracy J. Sukraw Posted Jun 29, 2015 Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service General Convention, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention 2015 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

In this hour of our testing: New York bishop writes…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Nov 1, 2017 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC November 1, 2017 at 7:25 pm ” If you are not able to find an IED or a bullet, then single out the disbelieving American, Frenchman, or any of their allies. Smash his head with a rock, or slaughter him with a knife, or run him over with your car, or throw him down from a high place, or choke him, or poison him.” ISIS spokesman Abu Mohammad al-Adnani, 2014.Christians change hearts through the Truth of the Word Made Flesh.These evil demons seek to only to steal, kill, and destroy. (John 10:10). TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ November 3, 2017 at 12:43 am It would be less confusing if Bishop Dietsche did not include terms such as “Muslim” and “Islamic community”. We are all shocked and unhappy with the killings done by suspect Sayfullo Saipov. It would be more realistic to portray the killings done by a soldier of ISIS than a Muslim. Such incident will undoubtedly force the US govt to re-examine their immigration policy but this will not be used as pretext of punishing the Islamic community as a whole. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC November 1, 2017 at 8:58 pm I am an Episcopalian born and raised and I have friends who are Muslim. I agree with the bishop sentiments most Muslims are not mileage that the religion of Islam teaches peace. The best analogy I have ever heard is that Islamic extremism (like ISIS Al Queda other Islamic terrorist groups) is to Islam what the Ku Klux Klan is to Christianity. Yes Jesus teaches us to love our neighbor as ourselves. But yes in times like this it’s easier said than done but nothing ever worth having or doing is ever easy. Turn to prayer turn to the church for comfort it’s not an empty sentiment. It’s a way to gather and start to heal and show the terrorist they didn’t win. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA November 1, 2017 at 5:13 pm Quentin Durward’s response encapsulates my thoughts exactly so I need not add to them. November 2, 2017 at 1:18 pm I agree completely with Quentin Durward. Church leaders who accuse members of their flock of hate-mongering because they believe in a tougher response to such outrages than reassuring words and flowers should be embarrassed by their own naivete. Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Jawaharlal Prasad says: Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York November 2, 2017 at 7:50 am From Bishop Dietsche; ‘Muslims are as bereaved and angry about these killings as anyone else in our city….’ This seems to be a common response to these terrorist attrocities. if this is so then where is the outrage and condemnation for such acts from organizations like CAIR & USCMO? Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Thomas Scott Ball Jr says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY November 1, 2017 at 8:45 pm I have typed in my e-mail address and my name correctly. What more information do you want, please? New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI November 1, 2017 at 11:33 am These press releases have become formulaic. I’m tired of hearing the same vacuous musings and calls to prayer from Church leaders in denial. There are some very sick people in world. We can’t help them and they can’t help themselves if we are all in denial. Implying that innocent people are dying because we don’t understand each other is crap. Love is very powerful but love is not passive. We should pray that our leaders find strength to stand up proactively against terrorism instead of meekly enabling it with lame excuses. November 6, 2017 at 3:06 pm Doug Desper is correct. Sadly, it seems there are fewer and fewer Episcopal clergymen who do not subscribe to the “few bad eggs” argument and those who do not largely keep quiet because they fear being ostracized and possibly hurt professionally. This is an unfortunate situation that clearly is among the reasons why so many faithful Episcopalians are leaving the Church. How many more horrors like New York will it take before there is any chance of the tide turning? And will there be any Episcopal Church left by that time worthy of saving? The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tony Oberdorfer says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET November 4, 2017 at 8:40 pm Appreciate the compliment Tony but there are times, I struggle a lot in deciding which is better – violence or non-violence. The country I come from has seen Muslim invasions for over thousand years and that too with greater brutality with repeated invasions. Honest historians have written much about this. I agree with you that Muslims have their own understanding as to how infidels ought to be treated. Read about the treatment of minorities in Islamic countries including Pakistan and Bangladesh. Surprisingly in India, often times, Hindus are made to feel second class citizens with respect to the Muslims over certain rights! I won’t be surprised if in near future, Christians in US will be made to feel as second class citizens.US should do what is best for the security of this nation and its citizens. In this hour of our testing: New York bishop writes to diocese after terror attack Quentin Durward says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Catherine Cummings says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Doug Desper says: Thomas Scott Ball Jr says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tony Oberdorfer says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ecumenical & Interreligious November 1, 2017 at 5:48 pm I do agree with Quentin Durward. We are ask by Jesus to Love our neighbor as ourselves. But these people that are doing the terrorism do not love us. They want to worship the way they do. To comfor to their way of thinking. If they want to do and think the way they do I have no problem with them going back to their own country. Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (14) [Episcopal Diocese of New York] My Dear Brothers and Sisters, The news of what appears to have been a terror-related attack in Lower Manhattan comes to me as Bishop Glasspool and I are continuing our visit to Bishop Chilongani in the Diocese of Central Tanganyika. How difficult it is to be away from our city when it is in crisis!I join with all in our diocese, all people of faith, and all our city in mourning the lives lost and the chaos visited upon our own streets. I know that opportunities for prayer are already being planned for tomorrow and following days. I urge you to go and be with one another, and pray with one another, and turn a common face toward the God who is balm for weary and broken hearts.I know that in every church the victims of this violence will be remembered in prayer today, tomorrow and at our Sunday liturgies. Pray also for our country, and for God’s guidance for our leaders. Pray for peace. Pray for understanding across religions, cultures and political philosophies. And pray for ourselves, that we may guard our hearts, that we may by the grace of God respond to hatred with love, and violence with peace.Once again it is crucial that we do not extrapolate from the violence committed by one man to condemn or blame the larger Islamic community, or to view all Muslims as dangerous. Faithful, peaceful Muslims are as bereaved and angry about these killings as anyone else in our city, and we know the Islamic community to be our friends.Now is the time when we who follow a God of peace, across our several religions, must stand together against all forces of destruction. Indeed, the love of peace and the renunciation of the evil powers which corrupt and destroy are contained within the heart of our baptismal life. That is who we are.I long to return to you, and pray for you every one in this hour of our testing. And always I remain Yours,The Rt. Rev. Andrew ML DietscheBishop of New York Tony Oberdorfer says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls November 3, 2017 at 2:51 pm Jawaharlal Prasad sounds like a decent person but I must disagree with him in distinguishing between a soldier of ISIS and a regular Muslim. Obviously there are many reasonably disposed Muslims around the world. But in my understanding the Koran specifies that no one can be a really good Muslim unless he commits himself to killing non-Muslim infidels who are unwilling to convert. Since most if not all of the terrorists such as Sayfullo Saipov “went terrorist” AFTER coming to the United States despite being thoroughly “vetted,” common sense suggests the advisability of a blanket ban on immigrants from certain Middle Eastern countries (with rare exceptions) until such time as the Islamic threat is finally over. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Jawaharlal Prasad says: Bill Louis says: Submit an Event Listing November 1, 2017 at 7:20 pm ” If you are not able to find an IED or a bullet, then single out the disbelieving American, Frenchman, or any of their allies. Smash his head with a rock, or slaughter him with a knife, or run him over with your car, or throw him down from a high place, or choke him, or poison him.” ISIS spokesman Abu Mohammad al-Adnani, 2014.Christians change hearts through the Truth of the Word Made Flesh.These evil demons seek to only to steal, kill, and destroy. (John 10:10). Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Thomas Scott Ball Jr says: Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing November 6, 2017 at 12:54 pm One day it must be faced that many countries with a majority Muslim culture often are in turmoil and violence. Lay aside any blame for the moment and simply observe the cultural realities of those countries where Islam dominates. Terror attack after terror attack has the same formulary by wishful apologists who rush to state that there are moderate Muslims. Of course there are – and those people are wonderful, but they will also honestly tell you that they dare not stick their necks out too far to challenge the majority view of Islam. Would they be welcomed in many of those nations where caliphate Islam dominates? Would they be targeted as apostates, even here in some of America’s mosques and schools? We have now gone well past the “few bad eggs” argument that tries to prove that cultural Islam has random lone wolves and that they do not represent true Islam. It begs to be asked, “How many thousands have made up the ‘bad eggs’ basket so far?” Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Dn. Dorothy Royal says: Barbara Burgess says: last_img read more