唔准唔开心

Capsized kayak prompts rescue mission off Donegal coast

first_imgRescue volunteers with the Bundoran RNLI were called to action this afternoon after a capsized kayak was spotted off the shore at Nuns Pool.The alarm was raised shortly before 3pm when concerned crew member Fergal Muller saw an empty kayak from the cliffs on Bundoran’s West End.The lifeboat was launched within five minutes, with helm Brian Gillespie and three crew members onboard. Once on scene, the crew recovered the kayak and began a 25-minute search for any occupants.Fortunately, during the search, word came to Bundoran Lifeboat Station that the occupant had been brought to shore by fellow kayakers while the kayak had been carried out to sea in a rip current. The lifeboat was subsequently stood down.Speaking following the call out, Captain Tony McGowan, Bundoran RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: “We are delighted that no one was in any immediate danger this afternoon and that the group of kayakers had made their way safely to shore. I would like to commend Fergal for his quick thinking in raising the alarm when he observed the capsized kayak and praise the crew for what was a swift response. “We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea regardless of their activity, to always respect the water. Always wear a lifejacket, always carry a means of communication and should you get into difficulty call 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard. “We would also appeal to everyone to remember that should you for any reason need to leave or abandon your vessel, to please report it as missing to the Coast Guard once you have safely made it to shore.”Capsized kayak prompts rescue mission off Donegal coast was last modified: November 17th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Africa: going for higher growth

first_img5 June 2006The 16th World Economic Forum on Africa closed in Cape Town at the weekend with hundreds of political and business leaders outlining commitments and ideas to scale up successes already achieved on the continent.“The critical challenge is to do things we know work and build the capacity to carry them out,” said South African President Thabo Mbeki.With an economic growth rate of 4.5% across Africa in 2005, Mbeki challenged participants to ensure that such figures were more than just statistics. “Does the growth create jobs?” Mbeki asked.The three-day meeting was held under the theme “going for growth”, and Maria Ramos, group chief executive of Transnet, noted that “as Africans we’re committed to growth because it is necessary to eradicate poverty and unemployment on our continent.”Ramos said mindsets still needed to change among all role players in order to achieve sustained growth. She called on the private sector to show “courage” when taking advantage of opportunities in Africa and to foster an understanding that “for everyone to benefit [from economic growth], you need to work together.”Ramos said positive economic and political changes were taking place in Africa and that it was imperative for all to “make sure that the things we commit to, we actually do.”Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete said agricultural development was critical to delivering growth-led employment, and called on private business to engage with governments in developing and modernising the sector. “We look at partnerships as the key to generate further growth,” Kikwete said.Syamal Gupta, chairman of Tata International, India, encouraged Africa to seek innovative solutions to its challenges and to promote small and medium enterprise development as a means of creating employment.“Big companies cannot create jobs, it is the small and medium ones that do,” Gupta said.He also cautioned participants against neglecting rural populations in their commercial endeavours. Referring to them as “the bottom of the pyramid,” Gupta said the constituency represented a large and significant economic sector that was willing to pay for services it received.Achievements, commitmentsAchievements of this year’s World Economic Forum on Africa included:The signing of the Investment Climate Facility (ICF) to facilitate investment throughout the continent. The ICF, endorsed by the Africa Economic Summit and the G8 in 2005, was launched last week with US$100-million in funding. The Nepad e-Schools Initiative, whose demonstration project will fund e-access in 120 schools across 16 African countries by mid-2007. The initiative aims to reach all 600 000 African schools within 10 years. The Forum’s Global Health Initiative, which launched guidelines for large companies to support HIV/Aids programmes within their supply chain, as well as employer-based malaria control programmes. The Forum’s Partnering Against Corruption Initiative, with 103 signatories representing US$500-billion in turnover, which is now engaging the African business community in its efforts.Future commitments made during the meeting included:The World Economic Forum’s public-private partnership to strengthen healthcare systems in Africa by addressing epidemic and pandemic diseases in particular. The partnership will be implemented at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2007 in Davos. The Forum of Young Global Leaders’ commitment to:Sponsoring a film series on African success stories.Launching a financial literacy programme in Rwanda.Establishing leadership development institutes throughout Africa.Managing director of the World Economic Forum, Peter Torreele, concluded the final session of the meeting on Friday by praising the economic and social progress in Africa over the past 10 years, an achievement he described as “absolutely outstanding.”“Throughout all of this, our belief has been that by bringing business together with governments and civil society, those partnerships could unlock Africa’s great potential, and would allow the continent to assume its proper role in the global economy.”SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

History meets fashion in ‘Hector’ label

first_img14 June 2012 Three young people from Soweto in the south of Johannesburg have begun an enterprising journey to uplift and inspire the young people of South Africa, in memory of late student activist Hector Pieterson. Sina Molefi, a half-sister to Pieterson, together with Zuza Mbatha and Tera Gaju, call themselves “activists of Hector Pieterson”, and say they are not out to exploit his name for money, but to use it to make a creative impact on the youth of South Africa whilst creating a legacy for his family. The three started a fashion label in 2007 – which they named after Pieterson – under Abasha Innovations – a closed corporation company they run jointly. They used the brand to commemorate not only the now world-famous teenager, but also all the other victims of the fateful day of 16 June, 1976 – the beginning of the Soweto uprising. Abasha is an isiZulu word that means “young people”. Since its establishment, the aim of the brand has been to preserve the valuable contribution of the youth of South Africa through fashion. Some of the items currently available include accessories like caps and handbags, while they also have ranges in T-shirts, skirts, dresses and suits. The trio’s clothes were initially sold at independent retail stores like the Y Shop in Rosebank and Cyberzone at the Carlton Centre in the Johannesburg city centre, but the team decided to expand and make it available through other channels. And so with their collective vision they began with plans to open a clothing store, which they hope will take his legacy to new heights. The store, expected to open in August, will be located outside the Hector Pieterson Museum in Orlando West. Their immediate plan is a modest one that involves operating the business out of a shipping container to start with, with the hope of venturing into a larger, more conducive space in future. One of the most immediate challenges for the team is securing sponsors for the store. Another idea they had was to get an advertiser to use the container space for exposure of their brand, which would in turn help them finance the day-to-day running of the store. But even that is proving to be a struggle. Once the store is up and running, the items sold will be directly available to their target market, young people in Soweto as well as to visitors to the memorial site. Fashion meets history The fashion identity of the “Hector Pieterson” label is a combination of South African township trends and urban styles, and was started with the hope that it will mean something to young people. “If young people and maybe even adults are wearing the clothes, they will help keep the memory alive,” says Mbatha. He hopes the story of 1976 is alive every day and inspiring change in the youth. Molefi, who is the creative director for the label, is responsible for the designs. She studied fashion design at Parktown College. Mbatha, who has also worked with well-known fashion label Loxion Kulca, manages the operations of Abasha, while the sales and marketing responsibilities of the label lie with Gaju.The Hector Pieterson Foundation The team at Abasha have not left their plans to inspire change entirely up to the success of the store. The company has also signed a binding agreement with the Hector Pieterson Foundation to further help support and empower young people. All profits from the label will go towards the foundation, which was started by Hector’s mother Dorothy and another sister Antoinette Sithole. The foundation’s work focuses on rehabilitating young people from broken families as well as orphans, and inspired by the childhood story of Dorothy, who herself was an orphaned at the age of 10. “The idea behind the foundation is to keep the memory and legacy of Hector Pieterson for generations to come,” says Sithole. The Abasha team hope this process will assist youth projects in previously disadvantaged communities. “Our mission is to uplift youth who are involved in different projects and initiatives so that they can inspire change,” says Mbatha, whose vision for the brand has not changed since its inception. “The youth must come up with their own ideas to create jobs, not just to make money.”The brand’s vision The Hector Pieterson brand will not be confined to South Africa only. Once the label becomes successful locally, Abasha plans to market it overseas and make it available for online purchase as well. “The struggle of apartheid is understood by people around the world and is recognised globally, as there are countries who have overcome similar trials and struggles for freedom,” says Mbatha. He also makes it clear that the label is not meant to be associated with June 16, 1976 or youth month for that matter. “The store will be an on-going, independent commitment to uplift the youth,” he says. “It will be a reminder to all South Africans of the sacrifices that were made for them to enjoy their democracy.” If all goes well with the store and the foundation, Abasha hopes to expand their operations towards designing school uniforms as well. All sales of uniforms made from schools that buy from them will be generously matched by Abasha in the form of donations to disadvantaged schools. “If, for instance, we make a sale of 20 000 school trousers, we will donate another 20 000 school trousers to a school in need of them,” says Mbatha.Support from South Africa The Hector Pieterson fashion brand will showcase its newest items of fashion and accessories at this year’s South African Fashion Week from 30 August to 2 September. Items from the store can also be purchased during the event at the pop-up store at Sandton City. Clothes from the label will also feature on the big screen. Veteran director Faith Isiakpere, a former senior producer at the BBC and filmmaker, approached Abasha last year to provide some of the wardrobe for her upcoming musical Cry for Love, a film inspired by the 2008 xenophobic attacks in South Africa. The clothes can be seen worn by well-renowned local artist Yvonne Chaka Chaka and actor Leleti Khumalo in the film. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more