南京红场夜网

T20 exodus hampering Windies – Lloyd

first_imgSYDNEY, Australia (CMC):Selection chief Clive Lloyd believes the exodus of players like Chris Gayle, Andre Russell and Lendl Simmons to the lucrative Twenty20 circuit has definitely had a negative impact on the development of the West Indies Test side.The legendary former West Indies captain said the absence of such players had left the Caribbean side with a vacuum and forced authorities in the region to undertake a rebuilding process.”You can’t fault them (players who have turned to T20s),” Lloyd told a media conference at the Sydney Cricket Ground yesterday.”The money that is being paid in these shorter games, it’s obvious that players are looking towards their future. And, unfortunately, we’re missing out, all those guys who we groomed have now left, so we’re left with a vacuum and we now have to fill that.”He continued: “People might say that we’re not a top-class side, but some of these guys [in the current squad] have only played four Test matches and we can’t bring anybody from home because they’ll be just as raw, or young.”Big Bash playersWhile West Indies have been locked in the current three-Test series against Australia, Gayle, Simmons and Russell have all been campaigning in theBig Bash League here for variousfranchises.Former Test and one-day captain Darren Sammy and all-rounder Dwayne Bravo are also involved in the Big Bash after having retired from the longer format of the game.Lloyd, who oversaw one of the most successful periods of West Indies cricket in the late 1970s and early 80s, said some of these players would have played key roles in the touring Test side.”That’s the situation we have; we have guys like Andre Russell, Lendl Simmons, Chris Gayle, Bravo and these fellas, (but) they’ve retired from the longer form of the game,” he explained.”I think somebody like Russell – surely we would have had a chat with him – but he has a problem with his knee and he’s just playing one-day cricket. Lendl Simmons, too, would have been a nice guy to have in the middle there because he’s an opener, (and) he plays spin very well; he would have fitted in fine with our batting.”But he’s not involved, so we’ve got to look somewhere else. It’s a bit of a sad situation, but I’m sure that our cricket will get better.”West Indies have struggled on tour so far, losing both Tests by significant margins. They went down by an innings and 212 runs in the Hobart opener before crashing to a 177-run loss in Melbourne last week.They face Australia in the final Test here starting today.last_img read more

Barrington Harvey has big day, but leaves Humboldt County Fair injured

first_imgFERNDALE >> Fifty-three-year-old Jamaican jockey Barrington Harvey has evidently found the “Fountain of Youth” in Ferndale.Nicknamed the “Marathon Man” for having piloted back-to-back winners of the C.J. Hindley-Humboldt County Marathon Handicap in 2010 (Come Back Native) and 2011 (Steel Blue), Harvey is doing his version of the “Barrington Bossanova” dancing in the winners’ circle again this year.Harvey looked like he turned back the clock on the opening day of the Humboldt County Fair when …last_img

The Parts List for Hearing

first_imgMake Like a BatIf you have good high-frequency hearing, you can use echoes to “see” your way around with sound, like a bat does. Researchers at the University of Southampton found that the high-frequency response gives the best results. This is a way blind people can compensate for loss of sight by leveraging the precision audio response of the ears.Bats, like dolphins, use biosonar for locating food. A paper in PNAS describes how they adjust the gape of their mouth to act as a zoom lens when they emit clicks. The prey have their ways for fighting back. Another paper in PNAS says that hawkmoths emit ultrasound to “jam” the bats’ sonar. The article claims that this jamming ability evolved separately two times in the moths.Update 5/13/15: Science Daily says that eardrums evolved independently in mammals and reptiles/birds; “convergent evolution can often result in structures that resemble each other so much that they appear to be homologous,” the evolutionist says.Ignore the evolutionary stories (good grief, convergent evolution again). Focus on the main thing: Ears are amazingly intricate organs. Talk about irreducible complexity! Imagine Darwinian luck getting even two proteins to work together, let alone 300 to a thousand. Look at the illustration. As elegant and lovely as it is, it would be useless without an even more complex brain able to receive the electrical impulses and interpret them.Things this complex, with such high performance specifications, do NOT just happen. The design is so over-the-top beautiful and functional, why do we even pay attention to mere humans who make up stories, saying it evolved? Get real; get intelligent design science. Image: Courtesy of Nelson Kiang, MEE(Visited 178 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Want to hear what goes on when you hear sounds? Hair cells wave in the fluid, responding to specific frequencies, and hundreds of proteins go into action.Talk about splitting hairs. Harvard Medical School begins a press release with some gee-whiz facts about the hair cells involved in hearing:For balance, five separate patches of hair cells sense movement and tell the brain where the head is in space while translating the pull of gravity.For hearing, a five cell-wide ribbon of 16,000 hair cells spirals inside the cochlea, the snail-shaped structure where hair cells vibrate in response to sound waves. Every cycle of sound waves sends microscopic cilia on the tips of these cells back and forth, riding a trampoline of cells suspended between two fluid-filled spaces.The movement opens pores in the cells, allowing electrical current to flow inside.  This conversion of mechanical to electrical signals sends nerve impulses to the brain, which then “hears” the sound.In their efforts to understand the causes of hereditary deafness, researchers at HMS have tried to first identify a “parts list” of players. Working with mice, they have identified about 300 genes involved in hearing so far, but they think only one-third of proteins are known.The cutaway diagram of a cochlea in the article looks like a highly structured, well-organized array of cells. (Image: Courtesy of Nelson Kiang, MEE). The hair cells are colored green. This array, resembling the keyboard of a pipe organ, tapers in the coils of the cochlea, with each rank of hair cells responding to specific frequencies.last_img read more