Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week: Rory

first_imgFacebook370Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Adopt-A-PetMeet Rory! He is lovely, 17-pound, 7 year-old Dachshund in search of a loving forever home where he can be part of the action! Rory simply adores humans, and is a sweet mature gentleman! He does well on a leash and knows his commands for “sit” and “wait.” When you visit Rory he will give you adoring glances and bring you a toy! Rory absolutely loves to play with toys! He will need a grain-free diet to keep him healthy and monthly flea treatments for an allergic reaction to fleas. He has a sincere desire to find his people, and does well with other dogs and children. Rory is a terrific companion and family dog!If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment to meet Rory in person, please contact the adoption team at Shelton Adopt-a-Pet. Emails are the preferred method of communication.Adopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always need volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit the Adopt-A-Pet website, our Facebook page or at the shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton. For more information, email thedoghouse3091@hotmail.com or call 360-432-3091.Hours of Operation: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.last_img read more

Informal Group Looks to Preserve Rumson Estate

first_imgBy John BurtonThe Rohallion Estate in Rumson is for sale and neighbors fear the property could be bought and subdivided for development.RUMSON — A group of area residents are hoping they can muster enough support to preserve a borough property that they believe has historical significance.The group, who met for the first time on Thursday, July 26, has begun hashing out ideas to save the Rohallion Estate, 45 Bellevue Ave., a sprawling 5-acre property with numerous large specimen trees and an expansive multistory home nestled in the center.The 10 members of the group walked through the palatial home and grounds. “Rumson starts losing its estates, it starts losing its validity,” fears Bob Baxter, a North Rohallion Drive resident and a member of the group.“I grew up here,” around the estate, said Nick McCabe, another area resident. “And I can’t tell you how beautiful it was.”McCabe’s parents bought their property, about 3 acres on North Rohallion, in the 1950s from the then-owners of estate.The fear for some is that the 5-acre tract will eventually be purchased and subdivided for development, possibly putting at risk the home, designed by the iconic late 19th and early 20th century architect Stanford White, who was responsible for the original Madison Square Garden.“We’re looking at a little piece of our heritage disappearing,” Baxter said.The Rohallion Estate on Bellevue Avenue in Rumson.The group is only in its infancy, but participants are discussing the possibility of raising the money needed to purchase the property, or if the property can be purchased by local or Monmouth County government to use for something appropriate. “You could do so much that wouldn’t be invasive,” McCabe said.“You could look at it as a park,” Baxter suggested.Another possibility would be to find a private buyer to consider using the location for a business that would work in the existing residential neighborhood, such as a bed-and-breakfast or even a catering facility.Edward Dean Adams commissioned White to design a country home in 1887, with the architect using a Normandy chateaux as his model, according to a history written by Derrill W. Hart.Khaled Mostafa is the current owner, according to borough tax rolls. It has been on the market for the last couple of years, said Pauline Poyner, with Coldwell Banker real estate agency.Borough tax records indicate it is assessed for $3,250,000, and the real estate listing puts the selling price at about $4.5 million, down from the original price of just under $5 million.Mayor John Ekdahl said borough officials “actually gave some thought to (purchasing) it before we built the new municipal building,” on East River Road a few years ago.The estate sits on a sprawling 5-acre property with numerous large specimen trees.However, when officials looked at the building, they found it would have been difficult – if not outright impossible – to reconfigure it for the borough’s uses and meet current requirements. “The layout just wasn’t appropriate to an office setting,” said Ekdahl.“At the end of the day I would love to see some public elegant use,” McCabe said.But the trick, observed, Jamie Wark, a Linden Lane resident who is part of the group, is “to figure out ways to make it financially feasible.”Group members said their next task will be to put together a plan to present to interested parties to begin the conversation about saving the location.Baxter was not deterred by the challenge.“We’re going to save it,” he said. “And, more than save it, we’re going to reinvent it into something that we all can be proud of.”The location, which is zoned for residential use that needs a minimum 1.5 acres for development, is adjacent to Rumson Country Day School, a private school.Any future subdivision of the property could prove problematic, Ekdahl speculated, given the location’s wealth of “some magnificent trees,” and the borough’s tree protection ordinance.The mayor shared group members’ appreciation of the site. “It was probably the most magnificent property in Rumson for years, or decades,” he said.last_img read more

RBC Teens Bring American Friendship to Cuba

first_imgBy Muriel J. SmithRED BANK – Let the governments of the United States and Cuba quibble and argue over their policies, but two volleyball players from Red Bank Catholic High School took positive action last week and demonstrated to Cuban teenagers just how friendly Americans really are.Junior Catherine Curtin of Atlantic Highlands and senior Ava Zockoll of Bay Head spent a week in Havana, traveling with parents Dan and Tricia Curtin and Nancy Zockoll, under the auspices of Cuba Educational Travel, to bring GUEST – the Girls Universal Empowerment Sports Tour – to this third world country which suffers as much poverty and need as many other nations where assistance programs are already in place.It was Catherine’s idea to bring friendship, knowledge, and the start of an easy camaraderie among young people in the largest city of a country 90 miles off the U.S. Southern border. “I was fortunate enough to travel with my parents to Cambodia several years ago,” Catherine said, “and the sight of the poverty there has remained with me since then. I wanted to do something to help someone less fortunate than us, and with Cuba just opening for American visitors again, I thought that would be the perfect place.”Pavel Garcia of Barrio Habana (center, green shirt) accompanied the group to the nightly cannon firing at Morro Fortress. Volleyball coach Reyneer (far left) and Muriel Smith (blue shirt) also joined the entourage.Catherine also knew that as popular as volleyball is in the United States, it’s even more so in other countries. So, with the help of her parents, Catherine contacted the American Embassy in Cuba who put her in touch with Cuba Educational Travel and GUEST, Catherine’s newly formed group, was launched.Catherine’s teammate senior Ava Zockoll, captain of the RBC girls’ team who also plays for Central Jersey Volleyball Academy, and a seasoned traveler herself, was ready, willing and able to take on the challenge of bringing American friendship to Cuba.Cuba Educational Travel put them in touch with Pavel Garcia Valdes and his wife Sandra Sotolongo Iglesias of Proyecto Comunitario Barrio Habana. The couple work tirelessly on the streets of Havana to give a better life to people of all ages. Pavel is as comfortable and efficient encouraging a group of teens on the street through the educational and social aspects of improving their lives as he is trying to find enough drinking water to keep a day care center open so senior citizens can enjoy the friendship and social benefits of others of all ages.All good things must come to an end – Curtin and Zockoll felt the new friendships they formed made a positive impact on their counterparts’ opinion of the U.S. On the last day, there were tears and promises of return visits.The American teens came to Cuba armed with gifts for their soon-to-be friends – volleyball nets, kneepads, volleyballs, game shirts in two colors for opposing team play, as well as open hearts and huge smiles. They left the comfort of air-conditioned gyms and well-polished courts and quickly adjusted to old, cracked concrete outdoor courts with boundary lines faded by the hot sun. All play was wrapped up by noon on any day when afternoon temps went well into the mid-90s.Volleyball, the warm-ups and exercises are all international, so not knowing the language did not present a disadvantage. What were shy exchanges of broken English and Spanish on the first day turned to laughs and friendly handshakes on the next, and later genuine laughter and friendship. On the last day, there were tears when they said their goodbyes amid promises of return visits.“If you can help people in one way, such as by sharing a sport, then you can connect on another level,” Catherine explained. She was surprised at the English speaking skills – however limited – that many of the girls had, and loved the welcoming attitude they exuded from the very first day.Ava agreed, pointing out that one of the reasons she wanted the experience was to be absorbed in another culture and help people with fewer opportunities than she herself has. She was surprised the Cuban teens did not appear to be as poverty-stricken as she had heard they were, and was impressed not only by the quality of the coaches but also their intensity and excellence in training the girls. Both teens commented on how polite, courteous, and well-mannered their Cuban counterparts were.Afternoons were spent with Pavel and an Educational Travel rep who took the American visitors through a series of cultural and educational experiences including a visit to a senior care center where the oldest client at 102, walks from his home on the third floor of a once well-maintained apartment the few blocks to the center where he can enjoy games, friendship, song and meals with other older Cubans. The group also visited a third floor walk-up apartment of a husband and wife renowned for their hip-hop music in clubs and cabarets across the country. The couple, who are black, were eager to speak about racism and said they both believe strongly it exists in Cuba.There was also a visit with Edel Bordon and his wife, Marina, and their children Pablo and Lucy. One of the finest artists in the country, Edel teaches art in his large and elegant 10th floor apartment overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, a home filled with the artwork of both Bardon and his students, as well as the photography of son Pablo.In between, there was a salsa dance lesson and a visit to Morro Castle where they experienced the nightly cannon firing by Cuban soldiers, dressed in colonial garb which dates back to the Spanish rule of the 17th century. Citizens set their watches by this 9 p.m. ritual, which commemorates the centuries when the cannon was fired each evening to tell residents to hurry behind the protective walls of the fortress before the gates were locked against marauders, pirates, and other evils.Although trips to private homes and historic sites were all planned by Cuba Educational Travel, the group could go their own way individually or together in the afternoons and evenings. Even with the limited experience, both Catherine and Ava felt they had made new friendships and had a positive effect on their counterparts’ opinion of the United States.Ava felt the best gift she left behind was showing the Cuban students they too can meet and interact with people they have never met in a positive way. Catherine agreed, and felt she also had given her new friends a better understanding of the American people.last_img read more

World War I-Era Ordnance Found Along Jersey Shore

first_imgGardner said crews spent the time between December and March sifting and digging through the sand, excavating up to 10 feet in some places. Metal detectors were also used on the beaches, as well as instruments to inspect the surf zone in the ocean as well.Gardner also added that there is no origin of the boosters, either where they came from or when then were dumped into the ocean. Though only speculating, he said they were most likely tossed overboard when considered as excess after WWI.The ordnance found along these beaches has no correlation to the mortar round found by a beachgoer at the F Beach Jan. 5 on Sandy Hook. That ordnance was destroyed by the Naval Weapon Station Earle’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal team, which closed down the beach two days later.“Unexploded ordnance are not uncommon at Gateway’s Sandy Hook Unit,” Gateway National Recreation Area’s superintendent Jen Nersesian said in a statement. “Not only was Fort Hancock an active military base until 1974, but this site was also the proving ground of the U.S. Army from 1874 until 1919.”Gardner said that since the search has ended along the three towns, residents can comfortably go to the beach, yet must always keep an eye out.“By conducting this thorough screening of the beaches, we do feel we’ve significantly reduced any potential risks to the public related to these items,” he said. “I do want to clarify although that highly unlikely, given the dynamic environment of the ocean and surf zone, the potential could still exist for an individual to discover one of these items.”In the chance someone encounters a possible unexploded ordnance, the USACE asks residents to follow the Three R’s:Recognize: A possible munition item has been encountered.Retreat: Mark the area and move away from the item.Report: Immediately notify a lifeguard or call 911 to report the discovery. This article was first published in the March 16-23 2017 print edition of The Two River Times. By Jay Cook |Over 300 pieces of military-grade ordnance, each no larger than a pocket-sized ChapStick, were recovered along beaches in three Shore towns, and ultimately disposed of safely.The beach towns of Loch Arbour, Allenhurst and Deal had been the site of a post-Sandy coastal storm risk management project spearheaded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), which began in 2015.Sand pumped onto those beaches for the replenishment was riddled with hundreds of fusing components for World War I-era artillery, unbeknownst to the USACE.Starting in December of 2016, the Baltimore District – which specializes in munitions and explosives – came to aid in the removal.“For the past couple months, what we’ve done is sifted through the sand that was placed on the beach, while being pumped in,” said Baltimore District spokesman Chris Gardner. “We modified our processes to prevent any more from being inadvertently pumped onto the beach.”In total, 362 fusing components, mostly consisting of boosters, were found over a three-month span, which ended in the first week in March.Boosters are one of four components to a basic artillery round, acting as the explosive agent. Despite their size, Gardner said, the pieces had the potential to still be live and dangerous.After collection, the rounds were taken to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst for safe detonation, said Staff Sgt. Caitlin Jones.On March 2, the 87th Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit destroyed 329 boosters on location at the base.“When those kinds of items are found in the region,” Jones said, “our team is trained to retrieve them in a variety of environments and safely dispose of them on our range.”last_img read more

Leafs explode past Cats 3-1 to complete weekend sweep

first_imgThe Nelson Leafs exploded for three third-period goal en route to a 3-1 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Creston Thunder Cats Saturday in the East Kootenay City.The win was the second of the weekend for the Leafs.Nelson opened weekend Thursday be edging the Grand Forks Border Bruins 2-1.Linden Horswill, Colton McCarthy, with his fifth goal of the season, and captain Colton Schell on the power play, was all the goals Leaf netminder Cody Boeckman would need to secure the win.Nelson dominated most of the game, firing a total of 42 shots at Cats goalie Michael Hails. The Coldstream native was perfect through 40 minutes, holding the Leafs scoreless and keep the home town ahead 1-0.Trevor Hanna scored the lone goal for the Cats.Nelson, 2-1-1, moves into second spot in Neil Murdoch Division standings, one point behind defending KIJHL champion Beaver Valley Nitehawks.The two Murdoch leaders begin a home-and-home series Friday in Fruitvale.The Beaver Valley contest concludes a four-game road trip for the Leafs.Nelson plays host to the Hawks Saturday at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.LEAF BANTER: Team captain Colton Schell is leading by example and leads the team in scoring with six points. Rookie Colton McCarthy is right behind Schell in points and Nelson in goals with five. McCarthy is also tied for the league lead in goals with Ryan Henderson of Columbia Valley. . . .Nelson rookie Jacob Boyczuk and defenceman Seth Schmidt each finished the Creston game with two assists. . . . Recently acquired forward Brendan Colter was in the lineup for both weekend games for the Leafs.last_img read more

And the Remax Valentine’s Mixed title goes to — Marsh rink

first_imgThe rink included Al May, Kelli May, Grant McKen and Heather McKen.In the C event, the Rick Cutler foursome took home bragging rights and the Kootenay Glass title.Cutler was joined by Deanna Cowden, Marlo Tedesco and Jamie Tedsco.In the D event, Erin May, Graham Jamin, Francois Laurent and Jude Stralak captured the Nelson Home Hardware trophy.The bonspiel attracted 22 teams from the host Nelson club along with rinks from Castlegar, Kaslo and Spokane.The games started Friday night and continued until the finals on Sunday afternoon. The Barry Marsh rink came away as the big winner at the Nelson Mixed Valnetine’s Bonspiel Sunday at the Heritage City Club.Marsh, John Rampone, Tammy Avis and Laurie Bagshaw won the Remax A event crown, sponsored by Glen Darough at Remax.In the B event, the May/McKen rink outlasted the field to claim the Sears Nelson Trophy.last_img read more

Rockies skate away with 5-2 victory over Nelson Leafs

first_imgThe winning woes, scoring woes . . . and every other conceivable woe continue to plague the Nelson Leafs hockey club.Columbia Valley Rockies skated into the NDCC Arena Saturday night, leaving with a 5-2 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Leafs. The loss, Nelson’s fourth straight and 11th in the past 14 games, dropped the Leafs into fourth spot in Murdoch Division standings.Grand Forks Border Bruins leapfrogged over the Leafs after stopping visiting Spokane Braves 8-3 Thursday in the Boundary City.Ray St. Jean, Doan Smith, Colton Sandboe, Kellen Marchand and Luke Bellerose score for the Rockies.Koleton Nelson and Brendan Smith replied for the Leafs.Nelson returns to action Tuesday in Grand Forks with a game against the Border Bruins.last_img

Nelson’s Dryden Hunt caps amazing Junior career with WHL Player of the Year award

first_imgAnd the awards just keep on coming for Nelson Minor Hockey grad and Moose Jaw Warriors sniper Dryden Hunt.Hunt, who beat out Western Conference and Victoria Royals defenceman Joe Hicketts, was crowned with the WHL’s highest honour Wednesday in Calgary when he was handed the Four Broncos Memorial Trophy as the league’s player of the year.Hunt was the Eastern Conference Four Broncos Memorial Trophy winner.The WHL’s top honour completed the storybook season for the 20-year-old forward, who was passed over in the 2010 WHL bantam draft.The 6-foot, 200-pound left-winger finished the regular season with league-high 58 goals while playing all 72 regular-season games in his final junior campaign. Hunt finished second to Adam Brooks of the Regina Pats in the WHL scoring race with 116.Hunt recorded five hat tricks in the month of February and has six on the season. He was named WHL player of the month for January and player of the week in February.Before scoring 58 times this season, Hunt’s best season came in 2014 when he registered 21 goals.Over his WHL career, Hunt scored 117 goals, had 132 assists for 249 points in 269 games.After being passed over in the bantam draft, Hunt found a home with Regina Pats for three plus seasons before begin traded to Medicine Hat Tigers midway through the 29014-15 season.Moose Jaw acquired Hunt before the start of the 2015-16 WHL season.Hunt, who attended off-season development camps in Carolina and Montreal, was also passed over in the NHL entry draft before landing an entry-level deal with Florida Panthers in March of this year.Hunts parents, Carla DeBiasio and Jeff Hunt, were in Calgary for the awards presentation.Check out the YouTube link of the award ceremony.last_img read more

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – SUNDAY MARCH 19, 2017

first_imgSANTA ANITA STATISTICS Jerry Hollendorfer12326192221%54%$1,701,389 BALTAS HAS NEAR-PERFECT ENTRY RECORDA day without Baltas at Santa Anita is like a day without sunshine, and while there has been more than enough erratic weather during the 12-week old Winter Meet, trainer Richard Baltas has been a constant, a racing secretary’s dream with 125 starters, second only to three-time Santa Anita training king Doug O’Neill’s 150.Baltas couldn’t recall the number of days he did not have a starter from his barn of 83 head based at Santa Anita and San Luis Rey Downs, but added with a laugh, “There haven’t been many, maybe a couple. That’s what I’m here for, and it’s hard to win at 18 percent when you run 125 horses.“Yesterday I thought we’d win two but we only won one, and we had one second and one third, so all three horses hit the board.”The fact is, Baltas has missed only one of 45 racing days without entering a horse this meet, that being Feb. 11.Baltas, who turns 56 on May 30, could add to that ever-expanding number with at least two more starters next weekend, Inordinate in Saturday’s San Luis Rey Stakes for older horses at a mile and a half on turf and Kiss At Midnight in Sunday’s $100,000 Dream of Summer Stakes, part of the Golden State Series for California-bred or sired horses, this for older fillies and mares at a mile on dirt.Inordinate, a five-year-old full horse by Harlan’s Holiday, ran second in an overnight race at a mile and a quarter on turf Feb. 25 in his only start for Baltas, who obtained the Kentucky-bred bay out of the November Fasig-Tipton Sale. Bred by Juddmonte Farms and previously owned by the internationally acclaimed Thoroughbred operation, Inordinate had been trained by 2016 Eclipse Award winner Chad Brown.“He ran well for us first time out and I believe he probably needed the race (his first since last Aug. 27),” Baltas said. “He’s come back to train well. He worked (six furlongs) in 1:12 and two on March 14. It looks like he might have a chance in the race. We’ll see.”Inordinate will be ridden by resurgent Corey Nakatani, who has enjoyed noticeable success with Baltas, winning nine times in 26 tries for the trainer.Kiss At Midnight was claimed for $25,000 in April of 2015 and has been second in four Cal-bred stakes, including last year’s Dream of Summer. The five-year-old Decarchy mare has earned $357,793, most of that under the direction of Baltas.Baltas, a native of Gary, Indiana, hometown of Tony Zale, the great middleweight champion of the 1950s, has had great success with claims. He posted his first stakes win with $32,000 claim Freedom Crest in the Grade II San Pasqual Handicap in 2001 and also the Grade II, $488,000 Goodwood Breeders’ Cup Handicap in which Freedom Crest defeated 2000 Horse of the Year Tiznow. On the bargain list as well is Big Macher, who was taken for $20,000 in 2013 and gave Baltas his first Grade I win, in the Bing Crosby Stakes in 2014. Big Macher was on the work tab Sunday morning, going three furlongs in 36.80.Baltas, who now resides in Los Alamitos with his wife, Debby, moved to Huntington Beach when he was nine, graduated from Marina High School in 1979, attended the races with his late father, Gus and fell in love with the sport.“I started going to the races when I was 13 with my father,” Baltas said. “My mother was at the races the other day. She’s 88. My Dad died when he was 74.”At 21 and wanting to break into the game, in 1983 Baltas moved to the heart of the Blue Grass country in Lexington, Kentucky, attended the Kentucky Equine Institute and began working at Spendthrift Farm where resided Triple Crown winners Seattle Slew and Affirmed.He rubbed yearlings and worked as a groom, learning the business “from the ground up,” through trainers such as Tom Skiffington, Eric Guillot, Barry Abrams, Craig Dollase and Richard Mandella.Baltas took out his trainer’s license in 1991 and won his first race at Hollywood Park with Latchburn.His wife, Debby, the “Julia Child of Racing Repast,” calls the shots at the track kitchen on Santa Anita’s backstretch. Her family ran the track kitchen at Hollywood Park until the track closed in December of 2013.Debby’s Mom, Norma, serves hungry patrons at the Fresh Gourmet, “a great stop for lunch or dinner” on 2004 Huntington Drive in San Marino, a few furlongs from Santa Anita.The San Luis Rey is expected to draw a full field. Probables include Ashleyluvssugar, Gary Stevens; Buster Douglas, Santiago Gonzalez; Flamboyant, Brice Blanc; Inordinate, Corey Nakatani; Itsinthepost, Tyler Baze; Liam the Charmer, Victor Espinoza; Papacoolpapacool, no rider; Site Read, Stewart Elliott; Some in Tieme, Tiago Pereira; Syntax, no rider; Texas Ryano, Joe Talamo; Up With the Birds, no rider; and Wanstead Gardens, no rider.Liam the Charmer and Site Read worked in company for Michael McCarthy Sunday, going five furlongs in 1:00.60 and 1:00.80, respectively. Asked how he liked the works, the on-the-run trainer said, “Loved ’em.” Bob Baffert601481023%53%$1,543,516 Kent Desormeaux14130171721%45%$1,706,151 Mark Glatt769111112%41%$460,215 Corey Nakatani76138917%39%$806,207 Martin Pedroza11615212313%51%$699,512 Luis Contreras8910102311%48%$487,537 Jamie Theriot7497512%28%$440,570 Tiago Pereira10712111711%37%$415,991 Philip D’Amato8918121320%48%$1,191,840 SINGLE PICK SIX JACKPOT CARRYOVER AT $317,374 Flavien Prat22852384323%58%$3,285,875 Tyler Baze24743463017%48%$2,375,552 (Current Through Saturday, March 18) Mike Smith561861432%68%$1,871,827 Rafael Bejarano13823232317%50%$1,656,326 Richard Baltas12522222018%51%$1,261,832 FINISH LINES: Las Virgenes winner Unique Bella, prepping for the Grade I Santa Anita Oaks on April 8, worked six furlongs for Jerry Hollendorfer Saturday in a bullet 1:11.20, fastest of 10 drills at the distance, the average time of which was 1:13.96. Unbeaten California Cup Oaks winner Sircat Sally also worked for Hollendorfer, going four furlongs in 48.40 . . . John Shirreffs reports Gormley and Royal Mo came out of their races in the San Felipe Stakes and Rebel Stakes in good order despite finishing unplaced and are being considered for the $1 million Santa Anita Derby on April 8 . . . There is a single ticket Pick Six Jackpot carryover today of $317,374.27 . . . Santa Anita presents a Winner’s Circle BBQ Championship on Saturday, April 1. Patrons can taste delicious samplings from masters of BBQ and enjoy a day of Thoroughbred racing. Special packages are available at santaanita.com/events . . . The annual Santa Anita Derby Day 5K Run and Walk takes place on Saturday, April 8. Visit derbyday5K.com or call 760-434 5255 for further information . . . According to Santa Anita statistician Jason Hom, favorites overall are winning at a 36.55 clip at the Winter Meet (144 out of 394) and at an even greater rate on dirt, 38.46 (115 of 299). The number drops to 30.53 on turf (29 of 95). Odds-on favorites are winning at 62.03 percent (49 of 79); in the money favorites at 72.08 (284 of 394); and in the money odds-on favorites at 94.94 percent (75 of 79) . . . Agent Nelson Arroyo has brother Norberto Jr. booked to ride Palos Verdes winner St. Joe Bay for leading trainer Peter Miller in the $2 million Golden Shaheen in Dubai next Saturday . . . Barretts Sales at Del Mar will be conducting their Select 2-year-old in Training Sale on Wednesday, March 29. Their training track preview will be on Monday, March 27, beginning at 10 a.m. The sale catalogue is available in the Santa Anita Racing Office and the complete catalogue is available on line as well at info@barretts.com . . . Condolences to the family of longtime Thoroughbred owner Nick Barron, who passed away earlier this month at age 85.  The owner of Hallett Boats, now Barron Boats, Inc., Barron and his wife Shirley resided in nearby Glendora. Services were held this past Wednesday at the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Monrovia. Victor Espinoza62915715%50%$755,487 TrainerMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won -more- Peter Miller9828221029%61%$1,378,586 UNIQUE BELLA BREEZES FOR SANTA ANITA OAKS JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won GORMLEY, ROYAL MO SANTA ANITA DERBY BOUND? Joseph Talamo15924162115%38%$822,023 Steven Miyadi60816613%50%$396,906 Norberto Arroyo, Jr.10219111019%39%$841,556 William Spawr32114534%63%$347,000 Stewart Elliott15417162411%37%$827,993 ELLIOTT TO RECEIVE WOOLF AWARD ON SUNDAY Doug O’Neill15018292112%45%$1,641,356 John Sadler6010121217%57%$625,380 Edwin Maldonado771291116%42%$372,616 Peter Eurton58116719%41%$600,402 3/3/3/3 Vladimir Cerin51912918%59%$491,664 ELLIOTT TO RECEIVE WOOLF AWARD NEXT SUNDAYVeteran jockey Stewart Elliott, who was named winner of the 2017 George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award on Feb. 24, will receive the prestigious trophy, which depicts the legendary George (The Iceman) Woolf, in a Winner’s Circle ceremony between races at Santa Anita next Sunday, March 26.Established to honor the memory of Woolf, who died following a spill on Santa Anita’s Club House turn on Jan. 3, 1946, the Woolf Award was first presented by Santa Anita in 1950 and this year marks the 68th anniversary of the honor that can only be won once.Voted on by jockeys nationwide, the Woolf Award seeks to recognize riders who have not only achieved a high degree of success in the saddle, but who have conducted both their personal and professional lives in a manner that brings credit to the sport of Thoroughbred racing and to them personally.Born in Toronto on March 11, 1965, Elliot celebrated his 52nd birthday on Santa Anita Handicap Day, March 11. A strong finisher who is also an outstanding judge of pace, Elliott, best known for capturing the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes with Smarty Jones, has now amassed more than 4,700 career wins.One of five 2017 Woolf finalists, Elliott outpolled contemporaries Kerwin Clark, Julien Leparoux, Glen Murphy and Scott Stevens. Santiago Gonzalez13113221710%40%$675,443 J. Keith Desormeaux4494620%43%$509,505 KING RICHARD ON A ROLL AT SANTA ANITA 24/7 James Cassidy4588318%42%$427,091 -30-last_img read more

Sugar Bears Fall to USC in NCAA Tournament

first_imgThe fourth set saw the Sugar Bears and Trojans play to a 3-3 tie, before Southern California used a 15-4 run to close out the set, and the match. Central Arkansas hit .000 in the fourth set, collecting just nine kills on 32 swings. Nash collected five of those kills, and Samantha Anderson added two.For the match, Central Arkansas hit .226, led by Allen, who hit .550 with 12 kills and two blocks. Nash, UCA’s lone senior this season, made the most of her final match for the Sugar Bears, matching Allen to tie for the team-high in kills while hitting .348 and collecting three blocks. Beaton chipped in with nine kills and Tippett had eight and a team-high 13 digs as Elizabeth Armstrong handed out a match-high 41 assists. Amanda Dimon finished the match with 11 digs and Emily Doss had 10.”We couldn’t get Savanah the ball enough,” said Chatman. “I’m so proud of her. Since she’s come back from her injury, her mentality has just gone to the next level. She hasn’t looked back. I remember talking about her after the Southland Tournament and saying the same thing. She’s arrived from a mentality standpoint; there is still some fine-tuning with her skill set, but I love that she’s finally gotten to this point mentality-wise, because it’s really exciting.”The loss brings to a close a season that saw Central Arkansas reach the 20-win mark for the seventh time in the last ten seasons and the first in three years under Chatman’s direction. The Sugar Bears won their third Southland Conference Tournament Title, led the SLC in wins on the year, and saw junior Samantha Anderson named the league’s Player of the Year, the seventh time in 12 seasons as a Southland member that the honor has gone to a Sugar Bear.”I think this year started at the end of last year, when we won seven of our last eight matches, we played Texas A&M-Corpus Christi better than anyone else in the tournament last year, and we knew this spring was going to be important for our development,” said Chatman. “Kudos to the staff to get the team to buy into what it was we were trying to do from both of those angles and to the team for buying in. We had a great spring, some good competition, and we carried that through into the non-conference portion of our schedule and then just kept going. We never had to remind the team of what we we’re supposed to be doing, they just knew and were ready to do it. I’m just so proud of this group. They knew at the end of the season last year that this was going to be a special season, they knew what it was going to take, and they did it. I’m just really proud of them. There are a lot of teams tonight that lost in singles digits or lost in three sets, and we battled with the number ten team in the country. We looked really impressive at times. I think we played really well tonight, and I’m very proud of how we represented our conference and our university.” “I thought we played some really good volleyball,” said UCA head coach Jeni Jones Chatman. “We knew we needed to play our best, we didn’t need to be perfect, but we needed to play our best. I thought we came out very strong with that tonight. Our service pressure was on point, I thought we were passing the ball very well tonight, especially in set one, and Elizabeth did a great job of running our offense; we weren’t a one-hit wonder just setting one person, I thought she ran a really diverse offense. That kept their block in a bit of a scramble, created some holes, and created some opportunities for us to do some positive things offensively.”While the first set saw seven ties and just one lead change, the second set featured 12 ties and four lead changes as neither side was able to take a lead larger than four points. The teams would play to a 4-4 draw before Central Arkansas used a 7-3 run, highlighted by a pair of kills from Beaton, to open up an 11-7 lead and force a timeout from the Trojans. USC would come out of the stoppage with a run of its own, taking eight of the next 10 points to take a 15-13 lead and cause Chatman to take her first timeout of the set. Central Arkansas would also make adjustments out of their timeout, taking the next two points to tie things up at 15-15. USC would take retake the two-point lead, and the Sugar Bears would again even things up starting a dance that saw the Trojans take the lead and the Sugar Bears tie it six times over the remainder of the set, until USC again broke a tie, this time at 23-23, to take the set and even the match at 1-1. Central Arkansas continued its hot hitting in the set, turning in a .396 clip with 14 kills on 28 swings. Allen added four kills to her tally, while Megan Nash picked up three.The third set continued the trends from the first two sets, featuring nine ties and a pair of lead changes. The teams would trade points early one, playing to an 11-11 tie before the Trojans used a 7-1 run to open up an 18-12 lead and force a Central Arkansas timeout. UCA would take another timeout after the Trojans took two more points to push the lead to 20-12, and would prove able to make the adjustment this time, using kills from Tippett, Beaton, and Allen to cut the Trojan advantage to 21-18. That would be as close as the Sugar Bears could get however, as USC used a 4-0 streak to close out the set and take a 2-1 lead in the match. Central Arkansas hit just. .139 in the set, getting three kills from Nash, and two each from Allen, Tippett, and Beaton.Dropped 2nd set 23-25. Tied 1-1 and ballin’. pic.twitter.com/T9XXzMN0x3— bradley widding (@bradleywidding) December 2, 2017 LOS ANGELES – The Central Arkansas Sugar Bears made their third appearance in the NCAA Tournament on Friday night, taking on the tenth-seeded Southern California Trojans USC’s Galen Center. The Sugar Bears, who were making their first NCAA appearance since back-to-back trips in 2012 and 2013, earned their first-ever NCAA set win, jumping out to a 1-0 lead in the match by taking the first set 25-22, before the Women of Troy rallied to take the next three sets 25-23, 25-18, 25-12.Central Arkansas (27-5) found itself in an early hole, as Southern California (23-9) built a 5-2 lead, but the Sugar Bears would take three straight points to even the set at 5-5. The Women of Troy would again open up a three-point lead on kills from Khalia Lanier and Brittany Abercrombie, but UCA would respond again, reeling off five consecutive points to grab a 14-12 advantage and force USC to take the first timeout of the match. The Sugar Bears and Trojans would continue the battle, trading points until the set was tied at 21-21, before Central Arkansas went on a 4-1 run to take the set 25-22 and earn a 1-0 lead in the match. Central Arkansas hit .378 as a team in the set, with Savanah Allen hitting .625 and tallying five kills, Haley Tippett matching her with five kills while hitting .444, and Amanda Beaton added four kills on a .500 attack percentage.Yup pic.twitter.com/7TgRhydFwl— bradley widding (@bradleywidding) December 2, 2017last_img read more